Phil Daru/Daru Strong

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Bram
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Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Bram » Tue Apr 23, 2019 8:17 pm

This guy came up in my youtube feed and I quickly have devoured 20+ videos.

He's the strength and conditioning coach for American Top Team - one of the top MMA teams out there - and pumps out videos on mobility, strength, explosiveness, endurance, etc.

His workouts seems to be, generally:

A) Dynamic Warm-Up with some activations and corrections. This includes CARs, this shit is hard! 2-3 reps of controlled joint ROM per side generally. And then skipping, some interesting muscle activation stuff, etc.

B) Plyometrics

C) Strength or Endurance

Sometimes he combines isometrics and plyometrics in a super-set.


A couple videos I like:

Dynamic Warm-Up for MMA:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9k2lo1RU28

Mobility for Grapplers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGAeiclLCBM


His website:

darustrong.com
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Bram » Tue Apr 23, 2019 8:39 pm

Now the reason I'm enjoying this....I have been trying for a while to tie a bunch of different elements together for my surfing:

1) Dynamic Movements for joint health and increased surfing performance
2) Stabilizer Training for the same
3) Strength Training yadda yada
4) Explosive Training yup

Up to discovering Phil's stuff, I might do dynamic warm-ups before I surf, stabilizer training on its own day, do a few strength days and then a plyo day - all in a given week.

And it's worked, but it's also felt schizophrenic and given me highly erratic days of surfing performance.

I've adopted Phil's warm-up approach and have begun integrating the majority of my stabilizer exercises into my warm-ups at a drastically reduced volume. E.g. 1 set of band side walks in the warm-up vs. 4-6 sets on their own day.

A few exercises, like external rotation, I'm still saving for the last few minutes as a finisher.

My Split....as it currently stands:

Upper Body
Lower Body
Full-Body

Each workout starts with some stabilizers mixed with some dynamic movements, followed by strength lifts on the upper/lower days and plyometrics, isometrics or power exercises on the full-body day.

I'm looking forwards to checking out more of his info. Hope this post was helpful :)
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by powerlifter54 » Thu Apr 25, 2019 6:02 pm

Good stuff.

Stretching and dynamic warmup has grown every year in my workouts.

Not a huge fan of plyometrics except in very limited and specific application.

Strength training needs to be very specific to your goals. And by that I mean The Whole program not just the specific exercises.

Never forget carryover is usually very overrated.
"Start slowly, then ease off". Tortuga Golden Striders Running Club, Pensacola 1984.

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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Bram » Fri Apr 26, 2019 4:05 am

powerlifter54 wrote:
Thu Apr 25, 2019 6:02 pm

Not a huge fan of plyometrics except in very limited and specific application.

Strength training needs to be very specific to your goals. And by that I mean The Whole program not just the specific exercises.

Never forget carryover is usually very overrated.
Can you go into more detail on the above?

I like plyometrics from the perspective of athletic performance, and there is some evidence that it's related to decreased risk of injuries.

As an aside, I've used this warm-up with some of my exercise clients and myself for upper body, or to loosen up the shoulders for Back Squats....so far I've gotten good feedback:

Shoulder Circles (like a rolling shrug) x 10 backward/10 forward
Elbow Circles (elbows at shoulder height, arms bent) x 10 backward/10 forward
1-Arm Circles (like windmilling a punch) x 10 backward each arm/10 forward each arm
2-Arm Circles x 10 backward/10 forward
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by powerlifter54 » Fri May 10, 2019 6:13 pm

Just saw this so sorry for not answering sooner. Like the warmup, but have found shoulder dislocated with bands to be the best thing here.

Ploys are to enhance or regain explosion. They are NOT for conditioning, and need to be done only by highly conditioned athletes. The volume and design of the drill needs to be carefully considered. 95% of the time theya re done wrong
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Bram » Wed May 15, 2019 11:16 pm

I see your point on plyo's. Although I will use some variations for conditioning, like medicine ball slams, I also use some purely for explosiveness, such as a box jump.

If technique isn't compromised, do you find fault in using a medicine ball slam for example in a complex with other exercises?
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Fat Cat » Thu May 16, 2019 1:37 am

I thought box jumps are not an example of plyometrics; that's just jumping. Plyometrics have to have an element of rebound, i.e., you jump and then jump again with the absolute minimum of contact with the ground. No?
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by powerlifter54 » Fri May 17, 2019 2:28 am

Not a big fan of medicine ball slams, but they aren’t bad. I like the rotational throwing drills a lot actually.

Plyos are jump up, jump down and rebound, jump back up. The issue is the impact of the jump. Really a lot of wear and tear. You can get almost as much rocking into jumps or doing banded box squats.

My doctor told me I could squat as heavy as I wanted (just don’t go ass to calf), but running on hard surfaces would destroy my new hip in a short time.

FWIW.
"Start slowly, then ease off". Tortuga Golden Striders Running Club, Pensacola 1984.

"But even snake wrestling beats life in the cube, for me at least. In measured doses."-Lex

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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Bram » Sat May 18, 2019 1:22 am

Fat Cat wrote:
Thu May 16, 2019 1:37 am
I thought box jumps are not an example of plyometrics; that's just jumping. Plyometrics have to have an element of rebound, i.e., you jump and then jump again with the absolute minimum of contact with the ground. No?
I always step down when I box jump, but I'm trying to keep my joints around. But I do use depth jumps interchangeably, though never from a height of more than maybe a foot. The idea of doing them from a meter plus sounds like a good way to fuck up your body. Plus I'm not that bouncy, so higher seems dumb.

Obese one, from wikipedia:

"Since its introduction in the early 1980s, two forms of plyometrics have evolved. In the original version of plyometrics, created by Russian scientist Yuri Verkhoshansky, it was defined as the shock method.[7][8] In this, the athlete would drop down from a height and experience a "shock" upon landing. This in turn would bring about a forced eccentric contraction which was then immediately switched to a concentric contraction as the athlete jumped upward. The landing and takeoff are executed in an extremely short period of time, in the range of 0.1–0.2 second. The shock method is the most effective method used by athletes to improve their speed, quickness, and power after development of a strong strength base.[8]"

"Rather than using the term plyometrics to indicate exercises utilizing the shock method, it may be preferable to use the term explosive or true plyometrics which can be considered the same as the plyometrics originally created by Verkhoshansky.[3] The shock method that he created was the result of studying the actions that occur in running and jumping. He found that the landings and takeoffs in these two skills involved high ground reaction forces that were executed in an extremely quick and explosive manner. For example, time of execution of the landing and takeoff in jumping was close to 0.20 second and in sprinting it was approximately 0.10 second.[7]"

"Since one of the main objectives of the Soviet research was to develop practical methods of training to improve athletic performance, Verkhoshansky tackled the task of how these forces in explosive execution could be duplicated in an exercise. By doing exercises such as the depth jump, that he created, the athlete would enhance his ability in the takeoff and his resultant performance in the running or jumping event.[8] He experimented with many different exercises, but the depth jump appeared to be the best for duplicating the forces in the landing and takeoff."

"The second version of plyometrics, seen to a great extent in the United States, relates to doing any form of jump regardless of execution time. Such jumps cannot be considered truly plyometric (as described by Verkhoshansky) since the intensity of execution is much lower and the time required for transitioning from the eccentric to the concentric contraction is much greater. The term plyometrics became very popular with the publication of many books on the subject matter. It now appears impossible to go back to its original meaning and method of execution.[citation needed]"

"As a result, it is important to distinguish which type of "plyometric" exercise is used in order to determine its effectiveness and potential to receive the stated benefits. Though the name plyometrics is given to all jumps, not all jumps are plyometric."
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Bram » Sat May 18, 2019 1:23 am

Thanks for the reply PL54...
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Fat Cat » Sat May 18, 2019 1:35 am

Thanks Bram, the quote actually jives with what I was trying, unsuccessfully to describe. Mahalo for the info.
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Bram » Sun May 19, 2019 10:20 pm

Fat Cat wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 1:35 am
Thanks Bram, the quote actually jives with what I was trying, unsuccessfully to describe. Mahalo for the info.
That's been an area of confusion for me for years - what IS a plyo. Appreciate you bringing it up because I didn't know what the correct term was and had to get to searching.
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Sangoma » Mon May 20, 2019 1:36 am

The idea of plyometrics is to trick the muscle into contracting at considerably higher power than is possible with the traditional, conscious effort.

To do that plyo makes use of the stretch reflex: if a tendon is stretched suddenly the Golgi body activates the contraction of the muscle, at the same time the antagonist muscle relaxes. Knee jerk test is the most available example of the stretch reflex.

With plyo golgi reflex mediated contraction is added on top of the conscious contraction, resulting in more tension. The obvious result if misused - trauma. Should be used with great caution and the knowledge.

Simple jumps don't qualify as plyos, you need fairly sudden and rapid stretch in order to activate the reflex.
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Re: Phil Daru/Daru Strong

Post by Fat Cat » Mon May 20, 2019 8:43 pm

That was a very succinct description smet. Well done.
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