Joel Jamieson article How Conditioning May Save Your Life

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Ryan
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Re: Joel Jamieson article How Conditioning May Save Your Life

Post by Ryan » Sat Nov 12, 2016 10:24 pm

I try to limit my work to 2 30 minute sessions and find staying in the 140-150 range provides the most bang for the buck.
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SubClaw
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Re: Joel Jamieson article How Conditioning May Save Your Life

Post by SubClaw » Sun Nov 13, 2016 7:53 am

Ryan wrote:I try to limit my work to 2 30 minute sessions and find staying in the 140-150 range provides the most bang for the buck.
I've found out that the old H-L-M scheme also applies to running: one long and ridiculously EASY 90-minute session, one short and kinda hard 30-minute session and one moderate 60-minute session.

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Sangoma
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Re: Joel Jamieson article How Conditioning May Save Your Life

Post by Sangoma » Sun Nov 13, 2016 9:17 pm

dead man walking wrote:
Sangoma wrote:To be frank, my last post was the result of coming back to biking after a long break, and the way I felt the next day probably wasn't diagnostic of the systematic effect. I am going to build up the cardio to half hour to an hour twice a week. Will give it couple of weeks to see what it does to me.
is 2 x 1/2 hour enough? or even 2 x1 hour.

twice a week seems shy of what's needed.
How much do you reckon is needed?
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Re: Joel Jamieson article How Conditioning May Save Your Life

Post by Sangoma » Sun Nov 13, 2016 9:23 pm

aussie luke wrote:
Shafpocalypse Now wrote:That's higher for me...like 140ish or so is where I start to want to mouth breath and get difficulty talking.
Unless you're like 80 or something then around 140 is probably right where you want to be to be within your aerobic zone.

All the crazy % based heart rate zones, heart rate reserve zones and all the rest generally seem to line up pretty bloody closely to the basic MAF formula: 180 - age. If already fit add 5. If really unfit minus another 5. If recovering from major injury or surgery minus another 5.

I've found nose breathing works well as a guide, but if you do it a lot you can get more efficient at it and eventually probably keep it going into a higher HR zone. But it's good to get a feel for what is an easy pace and what isn't.
BPM is very variable. A friend of mine is a serious squash player (used to play at university level), and he cannot get his HR above 140, no matter what load is thrown at him. I suspect it's the result of life long conditioning and different kind of cardio adaptation: predominant increase of stroke volume instead of both SV and HR, as mere mortals do.

For me PRE seems to be more suitable indicator to gauge aerobic intensity. My Zone 2 is around 130 BPM. At this rate I still space out most of the time.
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