Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

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bennyonesix
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by bennyonesix » Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:29 pm

I was 6 cups of strong coffee a day: before noon as well, none after.

I quit and almost fucking died every day for a month. I thought I was going mkre crazy than I am.

But I am fine now.

For me.

I also think fasting one day a week is good. At least for me. My bloodwork, pretty good to begin with, improved coincident with my getting serious about it.

dkay
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by dkay » Thu Dec 01, 2016 1:56 am

I have low blood pressure and I average about 8 cups of coffee a day. 3 morning mugs between wake up and leave for work (french press). Diet Coke on way to work. Two Diet Coke at work before coffee break. Americano or double espresso at coffee break at coffee shop. Possible later Diet Cokes in afternoon. I get headaches if don't drink a cup before noon. Strangely, hate speed (don't like being "speedy") - am an opiate guy if given choice.

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Sangoma
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by Sangoma » Thu Dec 01, 2016 9:59 am

Fuck's sake, I was trying to make a point that the heart rate is not the sole determinant of the effects of cardio. Replace coffee with Ephedrine if you wish, fucktards!
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Mickey O'neil
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by Mickey O'neil » Thu Dec 01, 2016 5:42 pm

I'm down with all of this. It just makes me feel better. Yoga or just some JM or mobility type drills (GMB free stuff, Sonnon's stuff) and the Jump Stretch flexibility routine when I don't have the time on inclination to throw in a DVD. I've also been throwing in FlowFit when I think of it. My yoga of choice is YRG, Yoga Doc's DVD or David Swenson Short Forms.
Blaidd Drwg wrote:
More Yoga.
More cardio
Tighter diet.

Sux to say it as I'm pretty far from that but I think that's where this movie goes.
Shaf quote:
IMO, yoga is convenient if you just pop in a disk or go to a class. Actually thinking up your own flexibility routine can be a bit of a pain in the ass. Yoga also tends to focus on breathing and mindfulness...which you can do with your own routine or practice, but it's not built in unless you build it in.

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odin
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by odin » Thu Dec 01, 2016 6:52 pm

Swenson's short forms are great.
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

climber511
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by climber511 » Thu Dec 01, 2016 7:04 pm

odin wrote:Swenson's short forms are great.
What I do - my favorite is the 30 minute routine.

dkay
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by dkay » Fri Dec 02, 2016 6:52 pm

I checked out those Swenson short forms on youtube and they look good- will have to give them a try. I do some of those moves in the morning if I'm feeling particularly stiff and just want to get moving, but I would probably benefit from a bit more mindful stretching taken at a slower pace.

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Sangoma
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by Sangoma » Fri Dec 02, 2016 9:57 pm

One of the "classic" articles on socio-economic status and health. It's many letters, but worthwhile read if you want to understand important factors behind health.

Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation Between Health and Economic Status
Between 1979 and 1989, white men with family incomes below $10,000 could expect to live 6.6 fewer years than white men in families with more than $25,000. This life-expectancy differential for black men in the same income groups was even larger--7.4 years longer life. These differences persist when data are arrayed by specific causes of death whether communicable or chronic diseases, accidents, suicides, or homicides. For example, death rates per 10,000 white men ages 25–64 with incomes below $10,000 were 32 for heart disease, 9 for lung cancer and 6 for diabetes. Among similarly aged white men with incomes over $25,000, rates were much smaller--heart disease 13, lung cancer 4, and diabetes 2.
Hands down, the most influential investigations of the social health gradient are the two “Whitehall” studies of British civil servants conducted almost 20 years apart. The original 1967 project documented for men a steep inverse relationship between employment grade and poor health outcomes, including mortality from many diseases. Beyond its extensive catalogue of the diverse medical outcomes associated with employment grade, the Whitehall I study was justly influential because its sample was mostly office workers with stable employment who would not be considered poor in any absolute sense. It came as a surprise to many that the association from socioeconomic status, as represented by employment grade, to health would be so steep in a population where the truly poor were not represented. The second reason for Whitehall I’s subsequent influence stemmed from its substantive conclusion that not much of the health gradient could be explained by poor health behaviors or access to medical care.
In terms of policy and scientific clout, Whitehall II is living up to the standard of its predecessor. The most salient finding is that the 20 year interval since Whitehall I has seen no diminution (in some cases even a widening) of the gradient in prevalence and incidence of many diseases and other health outcomes. In the twenty-five year follow-up of Whitehall 1 men ages 40–64, there was a four-fold higher relative risk of death from all causes of mortality from the lowest to highest grade (Marmot, 1999). The gradient apparently cuts across major causes of death--heart respiratory, and cancers (whether smoking related or not). This persistence of the health gradient when absolute income levels were rising in Britain and when there was a determined effort there to equalize access of all to health care is the primary intellectual challenge laid down by Whitehall I and II.
Job related characteristics that appear to matter include monotonous work over which a worker has little control. Low job control was found to contribute independently to the development of coronary hearth disease among both male and female civil servants. The physiological connection came from tests showing that fibrinogen levels were higher among workers with low control over their job. The importance of this result goes beyond the narrow finding by providing evidence that psycho-social stress may matter both on the job and elsewhere.
An alternative view on how economic status affects health emphasizes the negative impacts of even short exposures to bad times-- especially if they take place during critical periods of the human body’s development. How could short exposures matter all that much if health is a stock? In thinking about why and when brief episodes might matter, attention shifts from the age groups examined thus far to the childhood years and then right back to the womb. The most important work is being conducted by David Barker and his associates who are investigating the lasting impacts of fetal environment.
The third perspective sees the principal impacts as flowing not from brief episodes but instead from the accumulation of advantage and disadvantage through the life course. The cumulative, repeated wear and tear on the body over time arises from being bombarded by episodes of high and repeated stress. Since these episodes occur at different frequencies across socioeconomic groups, this accumulation contributes to the social health gradient. Besides identifying the salient types and sequences of events, a central theme of this research has involved isolating the physiological mechanisms at work.
The most provocative explanation for the social health gradient is that it reflects not a distribution of individual attributes or behaviors, but instead is a consequence of how societies are structured both economically and socially (Wilkinson, 1996). The degree of societal level income inequality is seen to have a direct bearing on its average health. The rationale has many variants, but a common theme is that inequality in relative rank raises levels of psycho-social stress which negatively affects endocrine and immunological processes. At least in industrial countries, it is not material deprivation that matters, but the stress associated with being at the bottom end of an unequal social pecking order. Besides income inequality, the most often mentioned health enhancing trait is social cohesion. Societies placing a strong value on caring for one another and less on individualism are hypothesized to be healthier ones.
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Sangoma
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Re: Interesting Conversation with my Cardiologist

Post by Sangoma » Fri Dec 02, 2016 10:05 pm

Compressing previous post into fewer words, there seems to be several important trends.

1. Low income is associated with more disease and death
2. What happens in childhood may influence the rest of life
3. Jobs where people feel trapped are associated with more disease and death
4. Income inequality is associated with more disease and death, even if you earn more than enough
5. Having a good community is good for health
6. Continuous wear and tear, both physical and emotional, leads to disease and death

Number 4 deserves thoughtful consideration. Income inequality is covertly presented to us virtually every minute. Almost every TV commercial reminds you that you don't have enough money. Every movie, book, magazine reminds you of that. It crosses over with No.6 - continuous mental wear and tear. That's why - I think - meditation, mindfulness and contemplation are so important. They allow you to separate from the false values and standards. As per my favorite movie: “You are not your job, you're not how much money you have in the bank. You are not the car you drive. You're not the contents of your wallet. You are not your fucking khakis. You are all singing, all dancing crap of the world.”
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