How to train yourself

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How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Thu Mar 16, 2017 5:48 am

I suspect this is old news, but I just came across this post on the IntenseMuscle and Iron Addicts forums.

How to train yourself
This is perhaps one of the most important articles I have written in a long time. It is about how to find the basic framework of routine structure that works best for YOU. As anyone that has been exposed to bodybuilding knows there are countless different training styles out there that all promise to give you the physique of your dreams. And they are all WRONG! And they are all CORRECT also. How can this be? Well what I meant by that is that they all work for some people at least some of the time. And MOST of them fail most of the people. Most bodybuilders continually sway back and forth, at least in their minds if not in the gym about how to train. They are lost in a sea of confusion about who is right and what the reality of effective training really is. Everyone has a very unique metabolism and what is pure magic for one person may be pure poison for another. Without going into too much detail I will just say that most guys out there in search that huge ripped physique just don’t have the genetics to make it happen. But…..almost everyone can build a physique that will impress about anyone except competitive level bodybuilders. How fast you get there, or if you ever get there at all depends on training and diet. Saving diet for another day lets discuss how to find an effective training protocol for you. In order to keep this from becoming the book it very well could be, we are going to keep the parameters limited. Instead of going into all the sub-categories of each basic training style we will just touch upon the “big picture” styles, because within them are the volume and frequency that is the guiding factor of whether progress is made or not. Once you understand your basic needs there will still be much work and experimentation to be done to fine tune everything to make it fit you. But at least you will be in a position to make gains while this occurs. Lets face it, MOST people out there pouring their heart and souls into training are making marginal at best gains.



The categories to be covered here are:

Volume Training, be that traditional or GVT
3 Day a week full body training
Power style bodybuilding
Hardgainer style training

In order for this “experiment” to be effective and work for anyone out there that might be willing to try it I am going to establish some guidelines for each training protocol to be followed. I ABSOLUTELY KNOW that the guidelines will not stand-up to criticism from many proponents of each categories training style. SAVE IT GUYS! I know it’s not perfect, and if you have a training style that fits you well and is effective great. MANY, MANY people are absolutely lost, and this will help them find their way if they are willing to take the time and take some risks. Those risks being that they absolutely will do some training that doesn’t work well for them. My guess though is that the people that haven’t put the pieces of the growth puzzle together yet are already not making progress so they have nothing to lose.
The rest is worthwhile reading.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Thu Mar 16, 2017 5:50 am

I like his take on hardgainer program:
Hardgainer Style Training. There are many people on these boards that have absolutely ZERO knowledge about this style of routine. And unfortunately they are most often the ones that spout off about how it could never work. One of the objections often quoted is “there is no way you could build a competitive physique with a routine like that”. To that I will say “no fucking duh”. No you are right you can’t build a competitive physique on a routine like this. But “duh Einstein” the VAST majority of the trainees out there will never build a competitive physique no matter what they do. That takes great genetics and unfortunately most people just have it. But with proper training most guys can get damn big and strong. Big enough to turn heads wherever they go. For MANY people out there Hardgainer style training is the one and only thing that will get them there. I can’t even count the number of trainees I have seen add 20-40 lbs in a few months after YEARS of making little or no gains. I know, I was one of them! I will make this category really simple on everyone. Do this:

Split your routine up into 2 or 3 days and after warm-ups do:

Bench Press or Dips 2 x 8-12

Bent Row or Pull-up 2 x 8-12

Military or Dumbell Press 2 x 8-12

Squat 2 x 8-12

Stiff Legged Deadlift 2 x 8-12

Weighted Abs 2 x 10
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Beer Jew » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:16 am

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Re: How to train yourself

Post by powerlifter54 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 12:28 pm

From my coming E-Book "It is Freakin Easy to Get Jacked",
...show up 3-4x a week minimum at the gym. Do 25-50 total reps on each exercise in that day's combination of squats, deadlifts, benches, rows, pull-ups, military presses, curls, dumbbell presses, dips or triceps extensions, calf raises, and heavy ab work. Do a little easy cardio to warmup and at least 1-2 other days a week. Eat relatively clean and enough to grow, which means 4 meals a Day minimum. You have to go buy this food at the store, not at a restaurant by the way. And cook it. Keep big nights on the town to about 1 a quarter, maybe 1 a month. Get lots of sleep. Don't hurt yourself fighting, falling, or crashing vehicles. Then repeat it 50 weeks a year for about 5 years. Easy.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Bob Wildes » Thu Mar 16, 2017 1:40 pm

That looks like a John Christy routine.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by DikTracy6000 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 1:53 pm

Bob Wildes wrote:That looks like a John Christy routine.
You can get huge on the Chris Christie routine as well.

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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:56 pm

powerlifter54 wrote:From my coming E-Book "It is Freakin Easy to Get Jacked",
...show up 3-4x a week minimum at the gym. Do 25-50 total reps on each exercise in that day's combination of squats, deadlifts, benches, rows, pull-ups, military presses, curls, dumbbell presses, dips or triceps extensions, calf raises, and heavy ab work. Do a little easy cardio to warmup and at least 1-2 other days a week. Eat relatively clean and enough to grow, which means 4 meals a Day minimum. You have to go buy this food at the store, not at a restaurant by the way. And cook it. Keep big nights on the town to about 1 a quarter, maybe 1 a month. Get lots of sleep. Don't hurt yourself fighting, falling, or crashing vehicles. Then repeat it 50 weeks a year for about 5 years. Easy.

11 exercises in total, 25 - 50 reps each - 275 to 550 reps per workout. For five years in a row... The problem of hypertrophy solved. Who is the genius? :-k
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Beer Jew » Thu Mar 16, 2017 11:48 pm

Sangoma wrote:
powerlifter54 wrote:From my coming E-Book "It is Freakin Easy to Get Jacked",
...show up 3-4x a week minimum at the gym. Do 25-50 total reps on each exercise in that day's combination of squats, deadlifts, benches, rows, pull-ups, military presses, curls, dumbbell presses, dips or triceps extensions, calf raises, and heavy ab work. Do a little easy cardio to warmup and at least 1-2 other days a week. Eat relatively clean and enough to grow, which means 4 meals a Day minimum. You have to go buy this food at the store, not at a restaurant by the way. And cook it. Keep big nights on the town to about 1 a quarter, maybe 1 a month. Get lots of sleep. Don't hurt yourself fighting, falling, or crashing vehicles. Then repeat it 50 weeks a year for about 5 years. Easy.

11 exercises in total, 25 - 50 reps each - 275 to 550 reps per workout. For five years in a row... The problem of hypertrophy solved. Who is the genius? :-k
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Alfred_E._Neuman » Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:49 am

Sangoma wrote:
powerlifter54 wrote:From my coming E-Book "It is Freakin Easy to Get Jacked",
...show up 3-4x a week minimum at the gym. Do 25-50 total reps on each exercise in that day's combination of squats, deadlifts, benches, rows, pull-ups, military presses, curls, dumbbell presses, dips or triceps extensions, calf raises, and heavy ab work. Do a little easy cardio to warmup and at least 1-2 other days a week. Eat relatively clean and enough to grow, which means 4 meals a Day minimum. You have to go buy this food at the store, not at a restaurant by the way. And cook it. Keep big nights on the town to about 1 a quarter, maybe 1 a month. Get lots of sleep. Don't hurt yourself fighting, falling, or crashing vehicles. Then repeat it 50 weeks a year for about 5 years. Easy.

11 exercises in total, 25 - 50 reps each - 275 to 550 reps per workout. For five years in a row... The problem of hypertrophy solved. Who is the genius? :-k
Do 25-50 total reps on each exercise in that day's combination of squats, deadlifts, benches, rows, pull-ups, military presses, curls, dumbbell presses, dips or triceps extensions, calf raises, and heavy ab work.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by dkay » Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:54 am

powerlifter54 wrote:From my coming E-Book "It is Freakin Easy to Get Jacked",
...show up 3-4x a week minimum at the gym. Do 25-50 total reps on each exercise in that day's combination of squats, deadlifts, benches, rows, pull-ups, military presses, curls, dumbbell presses, dips or triceps extensions, calf raises, and heavy ab work. Do a little easy cardio to warmup and at least 1-2 other days a week. Eat relatively clean and enough to grow, which means 4 meals a Day minimum. You have to go buy this food at the store, not at a restaurant by the way. And cook it. Keep big nights on the town to about 1 a quarter, maybe 1 a month. Get lots of sleep. Don't hurt yourself fighting, falling, or crashing vehicles. Then repeat it 50 weeks a year for about 5 years. Easy.
This is great advice for anybody. Well done, Jack.

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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Fri Mar 17, 2017 2:09 am

Well, I thought it is an interesting article. There is a reason there are so many templates in bodybuilding, and maybe the guy is right in what he stated in the first few sentences: everybody is different and what works for one may not work for another.

Beer Jew, you should join forces with Bux: his one-liners and your eloquent albeit vague use of smileys (one smiley) will make very enlightening conversations.

Neuman is right, I missed "the combination" part. Oh, oh, look, then Jack's advice becomes this guy's hardgainer template. Jesus, you guys can be so thick sometimes.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by JimZipCode » Fri Mar 17, 2017 3:24 am

On supps:
The most perfect routine is WORTHLESS if rest and nutrition are not there to back things up. You need to be getting 1.5 grams of protein per lb of bodyweight EVERY DAY, 2 grams if “on”. Other basics required are:

1 mega-dose multi-vitamin and full spectrum mineral packs

2000 mgs vit C a day

300% calcium/magnesium/zinc a day

4-10 grams of fish oil

Please understand this in the MINIMAL supps a trainee should take and far from optimal.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by powerlifter54 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:44 pm

Consistency trumps programming, by a lot. Yeah you need to eat well. I believe there are no hardgainers just inconsistent trainers who don't eat enough. And most bodybuilding programming is just to think of ways to alleviate the boredom of doing that much volume, cardio, and eating out of Tupperware.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by climber511 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:37 pm

powerlifter54 wrote:Consistency trumps programming, by a lot. Yeah you need to eat well. I believe there are no hardgainers just inconsistent trainers who don't eat enough. And most bodybuilding programming is just to think of ways to alleviate the boredom of doing that much volume, cardio, and eating out of Tupperware.
Great advice except for a few little items. No Bosu Ball triceps kickbacks while doing pistols. How do expect to get "swole" without those :) ?
The real problem of course is actually staying the course for the several years real progress takes. Few people have the patience and belief in the system to just hang in there and stick with it.

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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Blaidd Drwg » Fri Mar 17, 2017 4:49 pm

I think the idea that we respond to differently to physical stim is very separate from the way we respond to things mentally. There are few physical snowflakes. There are many many mental non-hackers (myself included) who lose motivation if the workload doesn't proceed just so.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Sat Mar 18, 2017 2:42 am

The concept of a "hardgainer" is an interesting and not very well researched one. Response to exercise - in our case resistance - varies between trainees. Here is an article on ageing population (>65 yo):

There Are No Nonresponders to Resistance-Type Exercise Training in Older Men and Women.
DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:
A retrospective analysis of the adaptive response to 12 (n = 110) and 24 (n = 85) weeks of supervised resistance-type exercise training in older (>65 years) men and women.

MEASUREMENTS:
Lean body mass (DXA), type I and type II muscle fiber size (biopsy), leg strength (1-RM on leg press and leg extension), and physical function (chair-rise time) were assessed at baseline, and after 12 and 24 weeks of resistance-type exercise training.

RESULTS:
1. Lean body mass increased by 0.9 ± 0.1 kg (range: -3.3 to +5.4 kg; P < .001) from 0 to 12 weeks of training.

2. From 0 to 24 weeks, lean body mass increased by 1.1 ± 0.2 kg (range: -1.8 to +9.2 kg; P < .001).

3. The 1-RM strength on the leg press and leg extension increased by 33 ± 2 kg (range: -36 to +87 kg; P < .001) and 20 ± 1 kg (range: -22 to +56 kg; P < .001) from 0 to 12 weeks.

4. From 0 to 24 weeks, leg press and leg extension 1-RM increased by 50 ± 3 kg (range: -28 to +145 kg; P < .001) and 29 ± 2 kg (range: -19 to +60 kg; P < .001).

5. Chair-rise time decreased by 1.3 ± 0.4 seconds (range: +21.6 to -12.5 seconds; P = .003) from 0 to 12 weeks. From 0 to 24 weeks, chair-rise time decreased by 2.3 ± 0.4 seconds (range: +10.5 to -23.0 seconds; P < .001).

6. Nonresponsiveness was not apparent in any subject, as a positive adaptive response on at least one training outcome was apparent in every subject.
You can see, the variation between subjects is wild. Jack, you should be inspired by the possibility of improving your chair-rise time by 20+ seconds. If you stick with it for 24 weeks :finga:

By the way, my interest in these articles is academic. I know what I need to do to get jacked if I decide to do so, and I am pretty happy with my current training. I am just fascinated by the topic and the weirdness of bodybuilding.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Sat Mar 18, 2017 2:47 am

Here is one with younger population. Though the conclusion regarding women and their strength gains is clearly a feminist conspiracy!

Variability in muscle size and strength gain after unilateral resistance training.
PURPOSE:
This study assessed variability in muscle size and strength changes in a large cohort of men and women after a unilateral resistance training program in the elbow flexors. A secondary purpose was to assess sex differences in size and strength changes after training.

METHODS:
Five hundred eighty-five subjects (342 women, 243 men) were tested at one of eight study centers. Isometric (MVC) and dynamic strength (one-repetition maximum (1RM)) of the elbow flexor muscles of each arm and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the biceps brachii (to determine cross-sectional area (CSA)) were assessed before and after 12 wk of progressive dynamic resistance training of the nondominant arm.

RESULTS:
Size changes ranged from -2 to +59% (-0.4 to +13.6 cm), 1RM strength gains ranged from 0 to +250% (0 to +10.2 kg), and MVC changes ranged from -32 to +149% (-15.9 to +52.6 kg). Coefficients of variation were 0.48 and 0.51 for changes in CSA (P = 0.44), 1.07 and 0.89 for changes in MVC (P < 0.01), and 0.55 and 0.59 for changes in CSA (P < 0.01) in men and women, respectively. Men experienced 2.5% greater gains for CSA (P < 0.01) compared with women. Despite greater absolute gains in men, relative increases in strength measures were greater in women versus men (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:
Men and women exhibit wide ranges of response to resistance training, with some subjects showing little to no gain, and others showing profound changes, increasing size by over 10 cm and doubling their strength. Men had only a slight advantage in relative size gains compared with women, whereas women outpaced men considerably in relative gains in strength.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Shafpocalypse Now » Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:00 am

Didn't Iron addict off himself?

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Re: How to train yourself

Post by newguy » Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:24 pm

Sangoma wrote:Here is one with younger population. Though the conclusion regarding women and their strength gains is clearly a feminist conspiracy!

Variability in muscle size and strength gain after unilateral resistance training.
PURPOSE:
This study assessed variability in muscle size and strength changes in a large cohort of men and women after a unilateral resistance training program in the elbow flexors. A secondary purpose was to assess sex differences in size and strength changes after training.

METHODS:
Five hundred eighty-five subjects (342 women, 243 men) were tested at one of eight study centers. Isometric (MVC) and dynamic strength (one-repetition maximum (1RM)) of the elbow flexor muscles of each arm and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the biceps brachii (to determine cross-sectional area (CSA)) were assessed before and after 12 wk of progressive dynamic resistance training of the nondominant arm.

RESULTS:
Size changes ranged from -2 to +59% (-0.4 to +13.6 cm), 1RM strength gains ranged from 0 to +250% (0 to +10.2 kg), and MVC changes ranged from -32 to +149% (-15.9 to +52.6 kg). Coefficients of variation were 0.48 and 0.51 for changes in CSA (P = 0.44), 1.07 and 0.89 for changes in MVC (P < 0.01), and 0.55 and 0.59 for changes in CSA (P < 0.01) in men and women, respectively. Men experienced 2.5% greater gains for CSA (P < 0.01) compared with women. Despite greater absolute gains in men, relative increases in strength measures were greater in women versus men (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:
Men and women exhibit wide ranges of response to resistance training, with some subjects showing little to no gain, and others showing profound changes, increasing size by over 10 cm and doubling their strength. Men had only a slight advantage in relative size gains compared with women, whereas women outpaced men considerably in relative gains in strength.
Did we really need a study to tell us that after 12 weeks of "unilateral elbow flex training" there would be a wide range of responses???????????
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Tue Mar 21, 2017 5:33 am

newguy wrote:
Sangoma wrote:Here is one with younger population. Though the conclusion regarding women and their strength gains is clearly a feminist conspiracy!

Variability in muscle size and strength gain after unilateral resistance training.
PURPOSE:
This study assessed variability in muscle size and strength changes in a large cohort of men and women after a unilateral resistance training program in the elbow flexors. A secondary purpose was to assess sex differences in size and strength changes after training.

METHODS:
Five hundred eighty-five subjects (342 women, 243 men) were tested at one of eight study centers. Isometric (MVC) and dynamic strength (one-repetition maximum (1RM)) of the elbow flexor muscles of each arm and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the biceps brachii (to determine cross-sectional area (CSA)) were assessed before and after 12 wk of progressive dynamic resistance training of the nondominant arm.

RESULTS:
Size changes ranged from -2 to +59% (-0.4 to +13.6 cm), 1RM strength gains ranged from 0 to +250% (0 to +10.2 kg), and MVC changes ranged from -32 to +149% (-15.9 to +52.6 kg). Coefficients of variation were 0.48 and 0.51 for changes in CSA (P = 0.44), 1.07 and 0.89 for changes in MVC (P < 0.01), and 0.55 and 0.59 for changes in CSA (P < 0.01) in men and women, respectively. Men experienced 2.5% greater gains for CSA (P < 0.01) compared with women. Despite greater absolute gains in men, relative increases in strength measures were greater in women versus men (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:
Men and women exhibit wide ranges of response to resistance training, with some subjects showing little to no gain, and others showing profound changes, increasing size by over 10 cm and doubling their strength. Men had only a slight advantage in relative size gains compared with women, whereas women outpaced men considerably in relative gains in strength.
Did we really need a study to tell us that after 12 weeks of "unilateral elbow flex training" there would be a wide range of responses???????????
Yes. That's what science is about: not wonderful romantic discoveries and relentless brainstorming, but systematic measurement. It's an old adage: if it cannot be measured it's not science. You can argue about the design of this particular study, but otherwise there is nothing wrong with the idea of measuring the effect of an intervention.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by newguy » Wed Mar 22, 2017 2:18 am

Sangoma wrote:
newguy wrote:
Sangoma wrote:Here is one with younger population. Though the conclusion regarding women and their strength gains is clearly a feminist conspiracy!

Variability in muscle size and strength gain after unilateral resistance training.
PURPOSE:
This study assessed variability in muscle size and strength changes in a large cohort of men and women after a unilateral resistance training program in the elbow flexors. A secondary purpose was to assess sex differences in size and strength changes after training.

METHODS:
Five hundred eighty-five subjects (342 women, 243 men) were tested at one of eight study centers. Isometric (MVC) and dynamic strength (one-repetition maximum (1RM)) of the elbow flexor muscles of each arm and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the biceps brachii (to determine cross-sectional area (CSA)) were assessed before and after 12 wk of progressive dynamic resistance training of the nondominant arm.

RESULTS:
Size changes ranged from -2 to +59% (-0.4 to +13.6 cm), 1RM strength gains ranged from 0 to +250% (0 to +10.2 kg), and MVC changes ranged from -32 to +149% (-15.9 to +52.6 kg). Coefficients of variation were 0.48 and 0.51 for changes in CSA (P = 0.44), 1.07 and 0.89 for changes in MVC (P < 0.01), and 0.55 and 0.59 for changes in CSA (P < 0.01) in men and women, respectively. Men experienced 2.5% greater gains for CSA (P < 0.01) compared with women. Despite greater absolute gains in men, relative increases in strength measures were greater in women versus men (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:
Men and women exhibit wide ranges of response to resistance training, with some subjects showing little to no gain, and others showing profound changes, increasing size by over 10 cm and doubling their strength. Men had only a slight advantage in relative size gains compared with women, whereas women outpaced men considerably in relative gains in strength.
Did we really need a study to tell us that after 12 weeks of "unilateral elbow flex training" there would be a wide range of responses???????????
Yes. That's what science is about: not wonderful romantic discoveries and relentless brainstorming, but systematic measurement. It's an old adage: if it cannot be measured it's not science. You can argue about the design of this particular study, but otherwise there is nothing wrong with the idea of measuring the effect of an intervention.
This is not science. Science creates a hypothesis, designs a study, tests the hypothesis and tries to come up with conclusions.

Imagine taking a group of 500 seven year olds and giving them 10 weeks to learn their multiplication tables. Then reporting that after 10 weeks, there was a lot of variation in who learned how much, with some learning all of them and some learning none.

It literally adds nothing to our knowledge bank because it is stupid. There is no "intervention" here.

We know that if you take a large group of people and "train" them there will be a variation in response.

Now....if they had isolated something....arm length.....sleep......protein intake....hormone levels in the blood...hand size....we might have something somewhat useful.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Sangoma » Wed Mar 22, 2017 5:00 am

I will break it down for you:

Intervention: unilateral resistance training for 12 weeks
Results:
Size changes ranged from -2 to +59% (-0.4 to +13.6 cm), 1RM strength gains ranged from 0 to +250% (0 to +10.2 kg), and MVC changes ranged from -32 to +149% (-15.9 to +52.6 kg). Coefficients of variation were 0.48 and 0.51 for changes in CSA (P = 0.44), 1.07 and 0.89 for changes in MVC (P < 0.01), and 0.55 and 0.59 for changes in CSA (P < 0.01) in men and women, respectively. Men experienced 2.5% greater gains for CSA (P < 0.01) compared with women. Despite greater absolute gains in men, relative increases in strength measures were greater in women versus men (P < 0.05).
let me know if you have any questions.
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by terra » Sat Apr 08, 2017 4:18 am

My thoughts on "Hardgainer-ness" are a little different (this may seem complicated but I think it simplifies the situation, a lot...).

The modern world kind of hijacks our natural defense mechanisms. Our natural mechanisms are confused by many seemingly innocuous aspects of the world we live in and by 'modern stress'. We haven't evolved a healthy response for this situation.

Our multi-tiered defense mechanisms (also known by misleading terms such as The Stress Response, Fight-Flight etc) involve and influence EVERY system and process in our body-mind. Everyone's system is quietly playing the "is there a tiger in the room or not" to a certain extent, in one way or another.

This situation can vary a LOT across a population and because in involves unconscious aspects of the nerve system it can also be hard to discern or manage and we are only just beginning to get a handle on it now. This also makes it quite difficult to eliminate as a confounding factor in our traditionally reductionist health science investigations (and IMO why our health science research often contradicts itself to the point of being beyond fucking useless).

If we dumb it down and artificially linear-ise it (for the purpose of keeping this post short), the process of habituating aspects of physiological defense mechanisms makes us less efficient, less adaptable and has us tend towards a catabolic state.

People who don't find themselves able to understand the concept that others can find it hard to gain even when 'doing everything right' may have been lucky to hit the jackpot and have physiology that's not impaired in this area by the incompatibility between our threat detection system and the modern world. However, they might have drawn a short straw in other areas - cardiovascular challenges, cancers, even erectile dysfunction ( <-- another 'hot' topic on this forum)... Areas where the gym-going 'hardgainer' might have been dealt an ace.

Re-habituating these physiological states back to a more healthy 'normal' (don't confuse normal with common, as our health sciences often do) and reducing the noise in the system, has huge potential in the area of 'Hardgainer-ness'.

A simple way to think of this is that 'training' is introducing a certain stressor to create a desired adaptive response (say, growth).
If your adaptive abilities are reduced or running in a hijacked/confused manner*, your physiology's ability to produce the healthy response you seek, (growth) may be significantly compromised. Resulting in poor progress, or worse.

...Your chosen training stressors may even produce undesirable physical/mental outcomes (compromised immune function, inability to regulate inflammatory response in certain tissues, poor modulation of limbic brain centers - poor motivation/focus etc).

*processes are non-linear and the positive/negative feedback loops can 'flip' depending on which level at which they have currently settled.
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Blaidd Drwg
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Re: How to train yourself

Post by Blaidd Drwg » Sat Apr 08, 2017 5:29 am

OTOH most people don't do enough volume.

Could it be that simple?

Yes
"He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that." JS Mill

JimZipCode
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Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2007 2:48 pm

Re: How to train yourself

Post by JimZipCode » Sat Apr 08, 2017 5:51 am

Blaidd Drwg wrote:OTOH most people don't do enough volume.
Ugh, "volume".
“War is the remedy our enemies have chosen. Other simple remedies were within their choice. You know it and they know it, but they wanted war, and I say let us give them all they want.”
― William Tecumseh Sherman

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