IGX "...overflowing with foulmouthed ignorance."

IGX "...overflowing with foulmouthed ignorance."
It is currently Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:33 am

<


All times are UTC




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1 2 Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Steve Maxwell Advices
PostPosted: Sun Aug 12, 2018 11:37 am 
Offline
Sarge
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 11:42 am
Posts: 167
A new Steve Maxwell post on training for the over 45 trainee.

http://www.maxwellsc.com/blog.cfm?blogID=200


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Aug 12, 2018 10:46 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 11:16 pm
Posts: 6356
I find $35 for the book of isometrics a little steep. One set of 6 reps, 6 seconds rest, that was in one 1970s booklet I had when I was a school kid. Three times a week. Exercises are not hard to figure out. I followed it for several month and then noticed some strange bumps on my shoulders that weren't there earlier. These were anterior delts, but at the time (I was 15) I was sure it was cancer of some sort...

_________________
Image


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 9:35 am 
Offline
Top
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:01 pm
Posts: 1692
That thing about slow, controlled reps piqued my curiosity. I'm not talking about ultraslooooooooooooow reps, but a sort of paused cadence.

Four seconds concentric, four seconds holding at the top of the movement, four seconds eccentric and another four seconds pause at the bottom seems to be somewhat popular among the calisthenics crew. Is there any merit to it?

That could be a nice way to make KBs "heavier".


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 3:14 pm 
Offline
Lifetime IGer
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 10:08 pm
Posts: 10652
Steve will annoy people with that article on over 45.

_________________
//:=)


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 7:30 pm 
Offline
Jesus Christ®
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 4:54 pm
Posts: 37050
Location: 鬼ヶ島
Quote:
Steve will annoy people with that article on over 45.
How so brah? I didn't see much that was objectionable.

_________________
"One's actions alone define whether one belongs to a good family or a bad family, valiant or arrogant, and disciplined or undisciplined." -Lord Rāma, Rāmāyaṇa


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 8:10 pm 
Offline
Lifetime IGer
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 10:08 pm
Posts: 10652
Quote:
Quote:
Steve will annoy people with that article on over 45.
How so brah? I didn't see much that was objectionable.
Nor did I. However:
Quote:
Once you've reached your mid-forties, you are merely trying to hold onto what you've built over your lifetime thus far; you are 100% in maintainence mode. This is a very fearful thing for a lot of guys to hear. Especially, if they were never that muscular and strong to begin with.
Nobody wants to hear that, especially nowadays where the HRT crowd is getting/staying fairly muscular and lean well past their mid-40s.

Similarly, the progress you get after five years is 'pretty much what you get' is not quite accurate but true enough to undercut a lot of the programming nonsense that gets thrown around.

Finally, starting young. I've been consistently surprised at how little progress guys who even start training in their 30's are able to make. Starting young is an insurmountable advantage IMO.

_________________
//:=)


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 8:49 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant

Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2013 4:12 pm
Posts: 409
Location: North of Vag
Maxwell is such a hardo has he ever smiled?

I liked the article and agree with it. Unless you're on something, it's hard to gain muscle as you get older. I'm 49 and have seen strength drop over the last 5 years. Nothing major, but it's noticeable.


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 9:08 pm 
Offline
Jesus Christ®
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 4:54 pm
Posts: 37050
Location: 鬼ヶ島
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
Steve will annoy people with that article on over 45.
How so brah? I didn't see much that was objectionable.
Nor did I. However:
Quote:
Once you've reached your mid-forties, you are merely trying to hold onto what you've built over your lifetime thus far; you are 100% in maintainence mode. This is a very fearful thing for a lot of guys to hear. Especially, if they were never that muscular and strong to begin with.
Nobody wants to hear that, especially nowadays where the HRT crowd is getting/staying fairly muscular and lean well past their mid-40s.

Similarly, the progress you get after five years is 'pretty much what you get' is not quite accurate but true enough to undercut a lot of the programming nonsense that gets thrown around.

Finally, starting young. I've been consistently surprised at how little progress guys who even start training in their 30's are able to make. Starting young is an insurmountable advantage IMO.
Basically, if your point is that he's gonna rustle jimmies by telling the truth, I'm with you.

The fitness industry is a shit sandwich of lies, hyperbolic exaggeration, and unfulfilled dreams. Honestly, if you wanted to deliver on the promise of useful lifelong training, your step one is to go buy some needles. Other than that, get ready for a long slide into mediocrity, decrepitude, and death.

Isn't that Tom "GILF-Hunter" Furman's recipe for lifelong fitness after all?

_________________
"One's actions alone define whether one belongs to a good family or a bad family, valiant or arrogant, and disciplined or undisciplined." -Lord Rāma, Rāmāyaṇa


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 1:17 am 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:29 am
Posts: 5571
Location: Surrounded by short irrational people
Jesus Christ you guys are a bunch of retards. Cycle between volume for joint health and heavier lifts for hormone and neurological health and stretch regularly. It's that fucking easy. And you should also get some fucking cardio because your heart needs to stay healthy. Quit trying to make it all fucking complicated and weird.

_________________
Quote:
Never eat more than you can lift.


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 1:17 am 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:29 am
Posts: 5571
Location: Surrounded by short irrational people
And eat more protein and more vegetables and quit eating processed shit.

_________________
Quote:
Never eat more than you can lift.


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 1:33 am 
Offline
Jesus Christ®
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 4:54 pm
Posts: 37050
Location: 鬼ヶ島
Uhhhh, which article did you read?

EDIT: To clarify, he specifically states that both low rep high intensity and high volume lower intensity approaches to resistance training have value. And while I don't recall him touching on diet, eat protein and vegetables is fairly well in line with what he's said in the past. Finally, you can lift correctly, eat correctly, and still not be anywhere near the "eeeeeeleeeeeeeeeet" fitness fantasy levels shown among the pros. The reality is that natty gains are totally worthwhile but pretty plebeian compared to what a solid cycle of gear can deliver.

_________________
"One's actions alone define whether one belongs to a good family or a bad family, valiant or arrogant, and disciplined or undisciplined." -Lord Rāma, Rāmāyaṇa


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 2:00 am 
Offline
Lifetime IGer
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 10:08 pm
Posts: 10652
Quote:
Jesus Christ you guys are a bunch of retards. Cycle between volume for joint health and heavier lifts for hormone and neurological health and stretch regularly. It's that fucking easy. And you should also get some fucking cardio because your heart needs to stay healthy. Quit trying to make it all fucking complicated and weird.
I think maybe you clicked a different link or didn't read anything.

_________________
//:=)


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:27 am 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 11:16 pm
Posts: 6356
With Test becoming more and more liberal keeping and maybe even adding strength in older age may become easier. Unless, of course, some douchebag of Joe Biden kind decides to make a career out of starting a crusade.

_________________
Image


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:45 am 
Offline
Top
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:01 pm
Posts: 1692
Quote:
And eat more protein and more vegetables and quit eating processed shit.
You are starting to sound like Dan John (which is a very good thing in my opinion).


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 5:02 am 
Offline
Top
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:01 pm
Posts: 1692
Quote:
Uhhhh, which article did you read?

EDIT: To clarify, he specifically states that both low rep high intensity and high volume lower intensity approaches to resistance training have value. And while I don't recall him touching on diet, eat protein and vegetables is fairly well in line with what he's said in the past. Finally, you can lift correctly, eat correctly, and still not be anywhere near the "eeeeeeleeeeeeeeeet" fitness fantasy levels shown among the pros. The reality is that natty gains are totally worthwhile but pretty plebeian compared to what a solid cycle of gear can deliver.
I also thought his “five years gains” point was spot on.

Of course you can (and should) strive for improving beyond that, but the harsh reality is that, after five years, you will have probably milked the vast majority of your potential in any endeavor. There’s always room for improvement, but diminishing returns territory is quite close too.

After five years of running, you should be able to finish a marathon. After five years of lifting, ypu should be able to pull a bit more than twice your bodyweight. After five years of grappling, you should be able to be competent enough to submit most guys out there.

To go past that point will take a toll: serious training plan, serious nutrition, serious focus and serious commitment. Is it really worth it?

Personally, I’d rather expand my interests, trying to become a wider, recreational generalist.

Going from a twice bodyweight deadlift to a thrice one will be quite a hard and long process. And for what? It’s quite unlikely I will ever need to do that in the real life outside the gym.

But, maintaining a twice bodyweight deadlift while trying to finish a marathon and getting your purple belt during the interim seems way much funnier, possibly easier and definitely more useful.

Time spent would probably be the same, but I’d rather be a well rounded generalist than a notable spedialist.


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 6:55 pm 
Online
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 11:38 am
Posts: 5261
Quote:
Of course you can (and should) strive for improving beyond that, but the harsh reality is that, after five years, you will have probably milked the vast majority of your potential in any endeavor. There’s always room for improvement, but diminishing returns territory is quite close too.

After five years of running, you should be able to finish a marathon. After five years of lifting, ypu should be able to pull a bit more than twice your bodyweight. After five years of grappling, you should be able to be competent enough to submit most guys out there.

I agree with your second point I quoted.

For the first point, I think it's highly dependent on a bunch of factors including, but not limited to, good coaching, athletic abilities and focused practice.

In surfing, I have had some coaching - some good, some poor; carry moderate athletic abilities and have avoided focused practice because it is not enjoyable. In fact I hate it, in surfing. In other sports, I loved it.

That said, after over 15 years of surfing, the past 2 have been by far the most productive in terms of skill acquisition and physical ability. It's like I got to one level and stayed roughly there for a decade, then have been having quite a few breakthroughs.

Just one man's experience....besides weight training and soccer, I've never continued any other physical activity past 5 years.

Oh lastly, the amount I enjoy surfing has increased right along with my increased ability. I truly love it now. It was something I enjoyed up until a few years ago.

_________________
"Believe strongly that the world is on your side if you keep true to what is best in you." - Master Carlos Gracie


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:12 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 10:11 pm
Posts: 6214
Quote:
And eat more protein and more vegetables and quit eating processed shit.
Very good advice...now get your ass in the kitchen and make it happen.


Top
   
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 11:18 pm 
Offline
Lifetime IGer

Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 5:39 pm
Posts: 19061
Quote:
I also thought his “five years gains” point was spot on.

Personally, I’d rather expand my interests, trying to become a wider, recreational generalist.

Going from a twice bodyweight deadlift to a thrice one will be quite a hard and long process. And for what? It’s quite unlikely I will ever need to do that in the real life outside the gym.

But, maintaining a twice bodyweight deadlift while trying to finish a marathon and getting your purple belt during the interim seems way much funnier, possibly easier and definitely more useful.

Time spent would probably be the same, but I’d rather be a well rounded generalist than a notable spedialist.
My observation, FWIW which may be very little is that unless you've gone deep into a single thing, your capacity to advance on multiple fronts of competence is limited....nay...I's say near impossible for most people of average physical gifts to reach even rudimentary levels.

As I enter a time of life when being a generalist seems fun, I am keenly aware that the only thing I really see myself advancing on are those areas which relate to competencies I already built over a long period of focused practice.

If you want to be a good generalist, learn to serialize your specificity.

_________________
"He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that." JS Mill


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 1:49 am 
Offline
Sgt. Major

Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2008 1:18 pm
Posts: 4037
Quote:
Maxwell is such a hardo has he ever smiled?

I liked the article and agree with it. Unless you're on something, it's hard to gain muscle as you get older. I'm 49 and have seen strength drop over the last 5 years. Nothing major, but it's noticeable.
49 has been very hard on the strength. I’ve found I can make the squats go up (mine has never been that high anyway). But where I really feel it is in the kettlebells. They all feel heavier. And it’s takes forever to build back what was easy to build up at 40,41, and 42.


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:50 am 
Offline
Top
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:01 pm
Posts: 1692
Quote:
As I enter a time of life when being a generalist seems fun, I am keenly aware that the only thing I really see myself advancing on are those areas which relate to competencies I already built over a long period of focused practice.

If you want to be a good generalist, learn to serialize your specificity.
True that.


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2018 12:16 pm 
Offline
Top

Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 7:30 pm
Posts: 1099
Quote:
I find $35 for the book of isometrics a little steep. One set of 6 reps, 6 seconds rest, that was in one 1970s booklet I had when I was a school kid. Three times a week. Exercises are not hard to figure out. I followed it for several month and then noticed some strange bumps on my shoulders that weren't there earlier. These were anterior delts, but at the time (I was 15) I was sure it was cancer of some sort...
http://isophit.com

"We are looking for businesses, organizations, and professionals in the health, fitness, rehabilitation, and sports performance industries, that want to exploit the scientifically proven benefits of isometric exercise within their new or existing facility."

Everything must be exploited. Because rubes and marks.

_________________
"All you have to do is decide that wherever you are is the best place there is. Once you start comparing one place to another, there's no end to it."- Sodo Yokoyama


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2018 11:27 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 11:16 pm
Posts: 6356
I would definitely want that child to be my coach. And to pay him $2000 plus to teach me.


Attachments:
Isophit.png
Isophit.png [ 472.46 KiB | Viewed 998 times ]

_________________
Image
Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 4:54 pm 
Offline
Lifetime IGer

Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 5:39 pm
Posts: 19061
despite his utter dogshit conclusions the article is not bad.

He's Dead Fucking Wrong about what is possible drug free but he's not far off of what Most people experience. I thought the goal of most people who commit to something like making significant changes is to not be "most people." But again. If you are reading Maxwell for new information, you're in his target demographic..Most People.

_________________
"He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that." JS Mill


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 9:48 pm 
Offline
Sgt. Major
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:46 am
Posts: 3998
Location: Motorin' around the South
For me and me alone, I don't really agree with the tone of the article. As nothing but a generalist who wants to be able to do most things that pass thru an addled mind, I don't really care that gains (of whatever kind) plateau after 4-5 since it's unlikely my goals are the same at that point. I'm not in maintenance mode. Yea, I try to keep a basic level of strength and aerobic capacity and mobility where I'm not definitively limited by any of them for the things I want to do. But I know that after some reasonable amount of specific training, I'll be able to do most things I want to pretty well.

_________________
A novice is someone who keeps asking himself if he is a novice. An intermediate is someone who is sick of training with weak people and an advanced person doesn't give a shit anymore. - Jim Wendler


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 12:48 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2007 4:21 am
Posts: 279
I agree that while I like to see someone focused on 'telling the truth' instead of selling snake oil, this article smacked of surrender and self-pity.

Also, some of it is just plain incorrect opinion asserted as fact. His claims that, basically, all routines and training modalities are the same (in terms of getting you to your 5 year potential), WL, PL, etc. are not good for 'training for health and longevity,' and any training over 20-30 minutes a few times a week is wasted time are all unsupported by any objective measures.

I appreciate hearing what his 'training journey' has been, and I loved "early-2000s, kettlebell Steve Maxweel," but the sad thing is that right now he looks (for what that is worth) worse than a fair chunk of the broke-dick old O-5s/O-6s and E-8s/E-9s I see trying to stay in shape at the gym I occasionally show up to, so I am not sure why I would take the advice of "defeated, Bedouin Steve Maxwell" over that of a guy or gal who still works 50 hours a week and stays in better shape than him?

_________________
______________________
"I'm something new entirely, with my own set of rules."


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1 2 Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited