IGX "...overflowing with foulmouthed ignorance."

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2019 12:11 am 
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Only endurance exercise slows down ageing
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Running, swimming, cycling and other types of endurance exercise can slow cellular aging, but strength training may not, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at how different types of exercise affected telomeres in 124 inactive, young, healthy adults.

Telomeres are protective caps on the ends of chromosomes. As you age, telomeres shorten and result in cell ageing. However, an enzyme called telomerase can counteract the shortening process and even add length to the telomeres.

The study participants were randomly assigned to six months of either: endurance training (long sessions of running); high-intensity interval training (high-intensity running alternating with slower running); resistance (weight) training; or no changes in activity (the control group).

Telomerase activity

The participants' telomere length and telomerase activity were assessed at the start of the study, and two to seven days after the final exercise session, according to the authors. The study was published in the European Heart Journal.

"Our main finding is that compared to the start of the study and the control group, in volunteers who did endurance and high-intensity training, telomerase activity and telomere length increased, which are both important for cellular ageing, regenerative capacity and thus, healthy ageing," said study leader Ulrich Laufs, a professor at Leipzig University in Germany. "Interestingly, resistance training did not exert these effects."

Compared to the resistance and control groups, telomerase activity increased two to threefold and telomere length increased significantly in the endurance and high-intensity training groups.

"The study identifies a mechanism by which endurance training – but not resistance training – improves healthy ageing. It may help to design future studies on this important topic by using telomere length as indicator of 'biological age' in future intervention studies," Laufs said in a journal news release.

Endurance and high-intensity training could increase telomere length and telomerase activity by affecting levels of nitric oxide in blood vessels, which produces changes in cells, the researchers theorised.

"From an evolutionary perspective, endurance and high-intensity training may mimic the advantageous traveling and fight-or-flight behaviour of our ancestors better than strength training," said study co-author Dr Christian Werner, from Saarland University in Germany.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2019 12:12 am 
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Full text of the original study:

Differential effects of endurance, interval, and resistance training on telomerase activity and telomere length in a randomized, controlled study

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2019 3:29 pm 
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I think you need to change the thread title to include HIIT too.

They got their HIIT fix from running, but I assume you can the same from more strength training-related regimes too.

All good news...

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:30 pm 
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I don't think you can replicate maximum effort of HIIT by lifting weights close to max. Can you do Tabata template with squat or deadlift? I think it is a sure recipe for injury. Why not pick up couple of endurance sessions once or twice a week instead, HIIT or LSD?

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:37 am 
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I don't think you can replicate maximum effort of HIIT by lifting weights close to max. Can you do Tabata template with squat or deadlift? I think it is a sure recipe for injury. Why not pick up couple of endurance sessions once or twice a week instead, HIIT or LSD?
Agreed. And, I think, the conclusions are unsurprising. However, there are a lot of ways to measure "aging" including loss of balance, range of motion, and sarcopenia; all of these markers benefit from strength training and given how easy it is to pick up a barbell a couple of times a week, there's no need to choose.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 4:32 am 
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Weight lifting in what I’ve seen in older folks fixes many of the visible aspects of aging. Seems like the endurance work fixes the actual aging.

Good argument for both.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 4:38 am 
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IMHO flexibility/dexterity and bone density are factors that are also pretty important as we age-- endurance training doesn't necessarily address them as effectively as other forms of training.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:26 am 
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This study addressed telomere length, which is an intermediate measure of longevity. To make things more confusing, there is no proven connection of diet and telomere length, though we know that reduced intake is associated with longevity. So no, this study is not the final answer. But it adds to the common sense that doing both lifting and cardio is probably better for the average Joe than one of them exclusively.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:08 pm 
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Quote:
This study addressed telomere length, which is an intermediate measure of longevity. To make things more confusing, there is no proven connection of diet and telomere length, though we know that reduced intake is associated with longevity. So no, this study is not the final answer. But it adds to the common sense that doing both lifting and cardio is probably better for the average Joe than one of them exclusively.
Agreed. Common sense and experience has shown me that a lot of physical movement (cardio) plus a few hours of strength training a week can take you pretty far towards fitness, physique, and longevity goals. Pair it with decent nutrition and recuperation and you are golden.

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