Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

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Bennyonesix1
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Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

Post by Bennyonesix1 » Fri Feb 28, 2020 2:49 pm

Looking at this rn. Any of you know about it or have experience?

Bjj has helped a lot. Thinking boxing and or muay thai. And juggling.

Any drills?

Thoughts?

For reference, ability to read and remember and enjoy books at Percy Jackson level. Some weirdness. No reversal of letters in writing. Very high IQ in most areas but dumb testing that shouldn't have been done revealed median scores in some areas.

Thanks.

motherjuggs&speed
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Re: Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

Post by motherjuggs&speed » Fri Feb 28, 2020 4:06 pm

A few thoughts --

First, has the child been tested for physical issues? I have amblyopia (lazy eye), which was detected early but I didn't do the treatment consistently (and what was known then wasn't as good). What seems to be dyslexia could be partially a vision problem. Occupational therapists are good at detecting things like this that sometimes don't show up otherwise. For example, I have a hearing perceptual disorder which wasn't detected until I was 16 -- the usual hearing tests showed well above normal hearing sensitivity, so the kid hears fine, right? No, I didn't -- when there's a lot of ambient noise everyone sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher. Also I have a good bit of face blindness. Not a full metal case or close to it, but I'm way worse than anyone I've known at distinguishing people. This has caused some very unpleasant and awkward situations. Some of these could have been avoided had I known about the physical issues earlier and adjusted my life accordingly. Some of the weirdness can be caused by things like this.

There is work by Ronald Davis that makes a lot of sense. I've never worked with anyone with dyslexia but the things he says about it correspond to my experience with my issues. For example, hammering in one "solution" and having that become a training scar, a bad habit that adds new problems. There's a quick primer here -- https://www.dyslexia.com/davis-differen ... s-methods/

I'm a juggler. It helped enormously with coordination, visual processing, and spacial ability. I'm still below average in these areas but I was way worse before juggling. Learning new tricks can also give a sense of accomplishment.

Sometimes people with one set of disorders have other things. There is a blogger who writes about this stuff here -- http://yesthattoo.blogspot.com
There is a lot of PC bullshit on that page, trans this, ableist that, but if you sift though it you can find some useful bits about what the first person experience is like to have some issues. This one is about autism, not dyslexia, but there's some good stuff about the experience of coping. Much more for the family than the child, so people can understand that sometimes things are too much.

I have some other thoughts but on a different tangent so I'll ponder and return later.

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Grandpa's Spells
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Re: Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

Post by Grandpa's Spells » Fri Feb 28, 2020 4:11 pm

The karate place I came up in developed a reputation for helping kids with pretty wide ranging issues/disabilities. We got some kids with Tourette's (in kids this manifests itself as physical ticks, not the verbal stuff you hear about in adults), cerebral palsy, developmental issues requiring crutches.

There's nothing supernatural about it, but a lot of people completely eliminated or greatly reduced symptoms. Giving kids something to do that is difficult but fun, let them fail and learn, and no pity, seemed to produce good outcomes. I would imagine similar activities could yield similar results.

But think about the actual goal. I grew up doing striking MA and would never encourage my kid to box or do muay thai. You are 100% shaving IQ points off at a developmental period where that can have really negative outcomes. My inlaws disagree for their 12 year old. "He's not really getting hit," later you see the pictures of him with a big smile with a bloody nose and abrasions showing he'd clearly taken other decent shots to the head. They don't have the neck strength to prevent concussions, way worse than for a post-puberty male (and not great for them either).
One of the downsides of the Internet is that it allows like-minded people to form communities, and sometimes those communities are stupid.

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Re: Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

Post by newguy » Fri Feb 28, 2020 4:16 pm

It certainly doesn't hurt and it can help.

The problem I've seen is that a lot of people spend a lot of time trying to do a lot of other "stuff" rather than get right to the heart of the issue. Karate could help with a lot of things, it might help with reading, but have you explored options that target reading and comprehension?

You mention the ability to and comprehend at the Percy Jackson level. What grade level should this person be reading at? What happens when you get above that level? Does fluidity stop? Decoding? Is all that good and the root issue is comprehension?

A good reading specialist is worth their weight in gold (and the price can reflect that as well.)

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Re: Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

Post by Bennyonesix1 » Fri Feb 28, 2020 5:55 pm

These are all excellent posts. Thank you very much.

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Re: Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

Post by Bennyonesix1 » Fri Feb 28, 2020 6:20 pm

Motherjugs

Will get physical eval. Great point. What do they call the specialists in this? What should I look for as to tests?

Spells

Agree as to sparring. But I think the motor skills training is excellent. The bjj has been great. The place is fantastic.

Newguy

Reading specialist is excellent. Will do.

Percy Jackson looks to be 6th grade and that's appropriate. He can read off the page easily. I don't know what precisely haplens at higher lvls, but I will check. You made me realize I don't know what the precise issues are.

General Points

There aren't any obvious (severe) issues. This may all be the result of creeping diagnoses. He's to all appearances a good normal kid. Just made nationals in history (idk what that is just got email). Has friends and likes sports and chess and has a sense of humor. Hates homework but homework is dumb and a waste of time. Social anxiety issues but then that's inherited. He's going to be tall and has huge feet so coordination issues may just be that.

Again, these are all excellent and thoughtful posts. Thanks.

Anyone else with thoughts please feel free to contribute.

Especially info as to determining btwn genuine cognitive issues and mere slower development.

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Re: Cross Lateral Movement for childhood dyslexia? Advice? Thoughts?

Post by motherjuggs&speed » Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:08 pm

Bennyonesix1 wrote:
Fri Feb 28, 2020 6:20 pm
Motherjugs

Will get physical eval. Great point. What do they call the specialists in this? What should I look for as to tests?
I don't have experience here but I've read that a good OC, occupational therapist, can help here. Part of what they do is figure out how to make a life task easier or more doable, but another thing they can do is assess where there is a weakness. It's common for OTs (and other therapists) who work with developmental disabilities in kids to detect things no one realized, as others have mentioned. Sometimes one problem can manifest as another. In my case, I did have a tendency to space out, but that was often triggered by losing the thread of a lesson due to me always sitting at the back of the classroom due to my social fear. If my hearing issue were known I would have maybe been made to sit at the front where I could hear clearly. Even better, by far, would have been not going to school in the first place but that's another story.

A big thing is asking what difficulties the child is having. I know a guy whose fabric sensitivity made it impossible for him to pay attention unless that was under control with the right clothes. Often a kid will try to play things like this off since he knows instinctively that being different is "bad" so he'd rather be thought of as indifferent or rebellious. I have no professional or clinical experience here but in teaching a lot of people things at juggling club or in the weight room, I've found that a neutral, non-judgmental approach is best. Not condemning but also not acting like he's a fragile flower who needs to be coddled or talked down to. So you can ask in a matter of fact way: "It seems like you struggle sometimes with x, is that true?", and "Are there things that make it easier or harder to do x?"", and "what do you need when something is hard?". It won't always be possible to adjust the environment, he still has to live in the world, but on the other hand, again using myself as an example, I cannot think clearly when there's noise. Can't do it. Of all my "stuff" that's the one that's the head shot. If he has an issue that's as strong as that, start the conversation now about how he has to live. Until recently I lived in cities my entire adult life and I wonder how much of my problems are connected to my utter incapacity to operate well in noisy or chaotic surroundings. You can't overcome everything, some things just have to be avoided.

I'd advise against leading him to think of himself as terminally weak, or entitled, or "I'm an XYZ." We've all known people who were overdiagnosed and they're a mess. My thought is to address whatever underlying issues first before Being Dyslexic becomes his identity.

My one dyslexic friend had tried to juggle once and couldn't do it at all. IMO he had a bad teacher.

Try to help him make the distinction between things that are hard, things he needs help with, and things he can't do. I'm all for pushing kids but don't break him: he may not be able to do some things, or maybe the other people won't let him if he's different enough, or thought of as weak. He might not have any big problem here but if he does, do not ignore it.

If he does need to see some specialist in dyslexia or whatevs, I wouldn't make a big deal of it. Katie goes to gymnastics on Mondays and Wednesdays, Jimmy goes to his teacher on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Not good, not bad, just something he does.

Edit: That went all over the place but maybe there's something useful there.

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