1 arm chinning advice from Brad Reid

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Old Mother
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1 arm chinning advice from Brad Reid

Post by Old Mother » Mon Apr 06, 2020 2:29 am

I've had this saved for years. I have a ton of shit that I've always meant to get around to, but just never did. Maybe you'll get some use out of it.

You probably need to have a decent "base" of two arm chinning under belt first, though not necessarily 20 or 30 reps, but at least able to chin "casually" for a really good count. But, lots of people can chin 20 or more reps and still can't budge a one-arm chin. Second, you won't be able to complete a one-arm chin unless you are able to hang with your chin over the bar with one hand statically like an isometric -- up at the top of the chin range. Then you progress as follows:


1) Start working with one-arm chins but assist with the free hand by grabbing the chinning wrist. (Some people mistakenly think of this a one arm chin but it is not since a one arm chin means the other hand makes no contact with the bar or any part of the body).



2) When you have mastered the first step, practice one-arm chins where you grab one hand-width higher on your chinning arm with your assisting arm. Follow a similar routine of sets and reps (more below on that).


3) Move the assisting hand up yet again higher on the forearm and practice there. The higher your chinning arm is held, the harder the chin becomes, but you are getting progressively stronger as you proceed.



4) Place the assisting hand on the chinning arm's biceps muscle and use it to assist completing the chins.



5) At this point check and make sure that you can hang in the top chin position for at least 10 seconds or so, to confirm you can pull yourself into the terminal position.



6) Now, you start practicing WITHOUT the assisting hand, but you will find that your body will rotate a little bit as you hang from one hand and as you pull to the top of the movement. This could feel odd and you need a little more help before you "solo" with one arm.



7) Tie a piece of light ribbon or a piece of string to the bar and grab the string/ribbon and use it to assist the pull just a little. This is sort of a security blanket I think and doesn't help all that much except sort of psychologically.

Start making attempts at one arm chins and note where you are failing -- low, mid or high up. The easiest to overcome is the high up weakness. For most people the weakest area is just getting started down low. I would recommend that you practice whatever part of the one arm chin you now can do: If you can jump up using a chair and start at the top and dip 3 or 4 inches and chin back up, work there to increase your range. If you can chin from the bottom but can't pull your chin above the bar, work some down there trying to increase your stroke.



8) I'd highly recommend performing 3 isometric holds of 8 to 12 seconds at the top (chin over the bar), the middle (arm at 90 degrees), and low (a couple of inches above a dead hang). One of these positions will be strong for you relative to the others so don't be afraid to grab a light barbell plate and start adding a little resistance.

N

ow, someone will no doubt ask about sets and reps for each of the above steps. What works for almost any exercise is sets of low reps but there is no Holy Grail here just like there isn't one specific set and rep routines that works best for all people. Every great lifter I've ever looked at had a routine that seemed slightly different than the next great lifter, yet they all seem to be remarkably similar. My best guess would be that after a quick warmup of the muscles, staying with 2 to 5 reps for several sets would work best for most people. And, limit the isometrics to just a single set. You may work these together or rotate through a few separate cycles as you stop making progress on one routine, flip to the other. Once you get your first true one-arm chin, you'll find that subsequent efforts will quickly become easier and you can start working on a second rep. Finally, a little base training in two arm training with added weight and low reps will help. My father liked to two arm chin with his brother hanging on and that would be good for power developer too just to round out your program. Cheers! Brad

Old Mother
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Re: 1 arm chinning advice from Brad Reid

Post by Old Mother » Mon Apr 06, 2020 2:32 am

One-hand Lift Tips by Ulf Salvin

Well, it just happens that I knew this guy who held the last official world record in the OHBS... the great Swedish lifter Ingemar Franzén. I believe he did ca 185 as a middleweight or light heavy (mid fifties). Sweden, if you did not know it, held championships in the one handed lifts far longer than other countries, and several lifters from country made world records, among them Georg Brunstedt in the one arm clean and jerk, with 117,5 kg as a heavy. (still standing)

Anyway, Ingemar Franzén later became the publisher of one of our lifting mags, Kraftsport (later called Hercules). I met him several times and we came to talk of his lifting. He had some sound advice:



1."You must practise first the drop under the weigth, using light weights only. This is the hardest part. Then you could almost exclusively train the pull!!"



2.A common fault is to place the leg of the lifting side closer to the bar than the other. This is a no-no, as you must use both legs equally for best results.


3. Turn your shoulder well over the bar!



4. Keep the whole foot on the floor when you dive under the bar, do not get up on ball of foot on lifting side, as this foot will turn out, and move forward.



5. Lean your upper body forward and well to the side when under the bar, for better stability.

There, maybe you can use some of this. Remember, he´s the world record holder! (Frasse died 15 years ago, by the way. Great man, really)


Ulf

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Re: 1 arm chinning advice from Brad Reid

Post by Old Mother » Mon Apr 06, 2020 2:36 am

A neat fat-loss split that I've been experimenting with.

From: Dan McVicker, RKC
Subject: Fitness
Date/Time 2003-08-08 02:51:38
Remote IP: 128.138.86.33
Message

I've gotten pretty good results with a (very flexible) split for fatloss that I've been working on. I'm at a low bodyfat (for me) and dropping fast. Of course, don't be an idiot about your diet, but a steady regimen of KBs will forgive many sins. Since I started working chinning and pullups more frequently, they are improving quite rapidly. I know this isn't a surprise, but ladders work.

M: Pullup ladders, medium volume. Burpees performed in descending sets (10, 9, 8 ...) to a medium volume. (For more information, see the end of this post).
T: High volume Chin-ups or PR attempt. Snatches, light volume, performed in any fashion you wish.
W: Burpees, high volume. (optional, low volume pullups, presses or pistols).
R: Chinups, medium volume. Snatches, medium volume.
F: Pullups, heavy volume or PR attempt. Burpees, light volume.
S: Snatches, heavy volume. (optional low volume chinups, presses or pistols)
U: off

I tend to repeat all ladders, so they look like this:
1, 2, 3, 4
1, 2, 3
1, 2
1

Unless I'm trying to hit a new "rung" on the ladder (a PR attempt), in which case, I shorten the workout somewhat, so it looks like this:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (PR)

This is to prevent failure.

Snatches can be performed in an asending ladder format, a descending format, a DOE manmaker format, or any other format you prefer. I mix up the sets and reps to get an appropriate level of volume for the day, but I keep the weight constant and heavy as I can handle.

Burpees are performed as in the article
A Completely Criminal Exercise Programby Ken Andes.

Presses and pistols address the two weaknesses of a pullup/burpee/snatch workout: not enough leg work, and no overhead pressing. If you're trying to gain or maintain one of these strengths, then you should substitute in either of these exercises.

Simple? Yes. An effective workout doesn't have to be rocket science.

Dan

Old Mother
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Re: 1 arm chinning advice from Brad Reid

Post by Old Mother » Mon Apr 06, 2020 2:39 am

The ORIGINAL Bear Routine ...

From: Kurt J. Wilkens
Subject: Fitness
Date/Time 2003-06-22 09:05:35
Remote IP: 205.188.208.7
Message

Alex --

This is from a post Pavel wrote on the old AmerROSS board way back when (those were the days!) to a 30-year-old guy who wanted to gain 30 pounds. This was before PTP came out, so I suppose Pavel simplified the following to fit within the parameters he set for the book. Personally, I think I prefer this slightly expanded approach, as opposed to that of PTP.

The post:

"No problem,

Pick a couple of compound exercises, for instance the deadlift and the military press, or the squat, the bench press, and the chin-up. Perform each drill at least twice a week on a schedule that works for you. Start light and do sets of five reps. Increase the weight on every set (rest for at least 3 min between the sets) until you reach a weight you can barely lift five times. Then back off in weight and do a lot of lighter sets of five with shorter, 1-2 min rest intervals. Let us say that you can bench 185 pounds for five reps. Your workout might look like this:

rest 3 min between sets: 135x5, 155x5, 165x5, 175x5, 180x5, 185x5;

rest 1-2 min between sets: 165x5, 175x5, 155x5, 145x5, 135x5

You will not gain muscle unless you eat a lot of protein. Eat things like meat, eggs and milk many times throughout the day and even set your alarm to have a snack or two in the middle of the night. Get a lot of sleep and cut back on your other activities. Stretching BETWEEN sets will help."

If I were doing this program, I would modify it somewhat: do 5x3-5 with 3 min rest intervals, working to a very heavy set of 3-5 reps (when I could get 5 reps with my heavy weight, I'd increase the weight on all my sets); then, for the short rest interval sets, I would drop some weight from the bar and do 5x5 with the same medium-heavy weight (in this case, say 165 or 170; this would simplify your training and record-keeping, and would allow for shorter RIs through not having to change the weights between sets).

As for the split, I would do squats and chins one day, and deads and bench the next (as I think Travis suggested above); alternate the workouts 3 or 4 days a week, depending on your recovery ability. As an option, you could do a split that puts both SQs and DLs in the same workout to allow more rest for the lower back; thus, the upper body day would almost be like active rest ;].

I hope this helps you, or that you at least found the 'Pavel-trivia' interesting.
Kurt

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Re: 1 arm chinning advice from Brad Reid

Post by nafod » Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:43 pm

Second, you won't be able to complete a one-arm chin unless you are able to hang with your chin over the bar with one hand statically like an isometric -- up at the top of the chin range.
I got to isometric holds back in my climbing days, but could never pull from the bottom.
Don’t believe everything you think.

Old Mother
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Re: 1 arm chinning advice from Brad Reid

Post by Old Mother » Wed Apr 08, 2020 5:24 pm

nafod wrote:
Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:43 pm
Second, you won't be able to complete a one-arm chin unless you are able to hang with your chin over the bar with one hand statically like an isometric -- up at the top of the chin range.
I got to isometric holds back in my climbing days, but could never pull from the bottom.
Did you ever try eccentric training after you were able to hold the isometric?

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