Misogi

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Bedlam 0-0-0
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Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Sat Apr 07, 2012 1:53 am

Starting another log. I was out of jiujitsu since September due to shoulder surgery. I'm starting back next weekend. Not being able to exercise at all for months while my shoulder healed really messed with my head. Deep depression etc. It forced me to look for ways other than physicality to deal. In short, "my mind is not alright" and "everything has all gone down wrong" (see video) I'm focusing my attention to using exercise, breathing, qigong, jiujitsu, bagua to get back to living. Usually I'm doing exercises very slow so I can get into my mind fluctuations when faced with pain and the desire to quit. Desire for comfort comes and goes in waves.



am
qigong
Sun Style Bagua 8 basic exercises x50 each
Bagua form x4
slow pincher pushup x1
slow pushups to failure 2 sets
wall press horse stance (low) 2 minutes
horse stance (low) 1 minute.
pranayama
*edit*--ice water douse

No work today so I got to play.
Bouldering followed by pranayama in the desert. Being in nature and in a meditative state makes it easier to become empty and allow the senses to bounce information into the abyss.

PM
qigong
pranayama leading to a 3:04 breath hold. Breath hold goes from peace and stillness to an undertow of self pity to silence. The after effect is peaceful...breathing slows down. Crossing the Rubicon.
Last edited by Bedlam 0-0-0 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 3:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Fat Cat » Sat Apr 07, 2012 2:21 am

Hi Bedlam, good luck on getting your shit back together. Where did you learn Sunjia Bagua? I do the Sun Taijiquan form, just for fun.
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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Sat Apr 07, 2012 3:23 am

I learned from Tim Cartmell. Have you seen his Sun Taiji dvds?

Where did you pick up the taiji? Damn man...your breadth of hands on knowledge in martial arts is pretty amazing.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Fat Cat » Sat Apr 07, 2012 6:04 am

I do have both his DVDs and books on the subject--you couldn't really say I have "picked it up"--I do it at a much lower level than what he does. Mostly for a light recuperation from jiujitsu with a faintly martial flavor. That's quite cool that you have trained with Tim Cartmell, it would certainly be an excellent opportunity. How long did you study with him?
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Re: Misogi

Post by Xian » Sat Apr 07, 2012 6:11 am

Good luck Bedlam - looking forward to reading more of your progress
There is a vast difference between treating effects and adjusting the causes.

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Re: Misogi

Post by odin » Sat Apr 07, 2012 8:11 pm

another log I'll be reading with interest. Bouldering + pranayama in the desert sounds like a day well spent!

Good luck with it.
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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Re: Misogi

Post by Mickey O'neil » Sat Apr 07, 2012 8:17 pm

odin wrote:another log I'll be reading with interest. Bouldering + pranayama in the desert sounds like a day well spent!

Good luck with it.
Me too.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Sun Apr 08, 2012 4:48 am

Thanks for the good words guys.
Fatcat, I've trained with Tim for the last 3.5 years or so. It has been the best opportunity I've ever had and he is the best teacher I have ever encountered and a cool dude to boot. I really like his approach to training both for standup and ground. I can't say enough positive things about Tim.

am
qigong
pm
8 basic bagua exercises x50
Sun Bagua form x2
shiko
horsestance
heels together slow squats.

uddiyana bandha x6
pranayama...working toward approximately evenness of inhale, inhale retention, exhale, exhale retention. Exhale retention is the hardest portion for me followed by controlling the beginning of the inhalation. The inhale retention is the easiest. The exhale retention provides the deepest silence (though shortest) of my mind. There is a point in the inhale retention where I feel a shift. I can continue to hold but it will throw the other parts of the breath into recovery (quicker). Sometimes I only emphasize one part of the breath (long inhale retention lately) but I know I need to keep integrating the increases in one area with evenness in all the areas.

Cold water douse.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Fat Cat » Mon Apr 09, 2012 2:16 am

Very cool man, say hi to Tim from an unknown fan of his work.
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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Mon Apr 09, 2012 4:50 am

Will do Fatcat!

am.
qigong
uddiyana bandha x6
pranayama

pm
qigong
seated forward bend 10 minutes.
Beat the panties off this game:
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Dharana: Concentration is the process of holding or fixing the attention of mind onto the pinball.
Dhyana: Meditation is sustained concentration, whereby the attention continues to hold or repeat the pinball's movements.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Xian » Mon Apr 09, 2012 7:23 am

First time I've seen an arcade game in a log entry =D>

I love the simplicity of your pranayama practice. Do you do it sitting or lying down? Alternate nostril or regular nostril breathing? With or without bandhas on breath retention?

Is the uddiyana bandha to prepare for the pranayama work or why do you do it? Have you considered playing around with nauli? All the pro freedivers i know of practice it in one form or another, an it is the single greatest exercise i know of to remove tension in abdominal area.

Good training to you!
There is a vast difference between treating effects and adjusting the causes.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Soupbone » Mon Apr 09, 2012 2:32 pm

Fat Cat wrote:Very cool man, say hi to Tim from an unknown fan of his work.
Me too!

Mark this as one of the new logs that I will be reading with interest. Training with Tim or taking a private from him is on my bucket list!

Good luck on getting things back under control!

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I just started a blog called The Happy Grappler. Check it out at http://happygrappler.blogspot.com

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Mon Apr 09, 2012 2:42 pm

Sitting or lying down? Both. At home mostly lying down. In nature, sitting. I also practice breath control when going on daily walks.
Alternate nostril or regular? Both. Depends on what my mind/body says. Mostly regular/ujjiya.
With or without bandhas? If sitting or lying down usually with chin and mula bandha. After warming up I usually add uddiyana (it seems to really kick things into gear).
Breath retention? Right now I often start with no breath retention, then move to inhale retention, then add exhale retention. Iyengar's books state that when learning one should start with even breathing, when that is "mastered" move to inhalation retention. When that can be done with ease to work on exhale retention. Lastly to put it all together. I really don't have any steadfast rules. I just work where I feel I need it.

I do uddiyana bandha for a couple reasons: 1. strengthen the diaphragm and begin to gain more control over it. 2. to practice for pranayma. 3. to stimulate the internal organs. 4. There is a different effect when doing uddiyana while standing (bent over) and then stand up straight (maintaining chin lock etc). When sitting or lying down the abdominal muscles seem to be less engaged and it is easier to to the lock. When standing those muscles seem to also help stabilize the spine so it gives a different effect. I think bending over while standing and starting the lock makes it easier to really get a grip on the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. More so than sitting imo. Plus there is a psychological component of standing (more active and engaged in the world) vs sitting and lying down (less engaged). I think this may help bring the gap of practice into real life. One Tummo practice I found described doing breath retention with all three major locks while standing in a sumo type squat. It was said that doing it while standing made the person more grounded and more able to bridge the gap. I don't fully know what the truth is to this but I am experimenting.

Nauli? I don't practice this yet. I don't have enough control yet and am still learning to feel everything in the uddiyana bandha. It looks cool but I'm not there yet.

Re: simplicity. I think we discussed on PM about this so I might be repeating. Patanjali only had a couple of lines about pranayama. As far as technique goes he mainly just wrote about the three parts-inhalation, exhalation and retention or transition. I think later on people found different ways to effect this and developed all the different techniques. For example somebody probably noticed that at different times their nostrils were more closed up and the breath wasn't evenly effecting each nostril so they plugged one and made the breathe completely through one side then the other. That way they get the same amount of breath and evenness is found. I think if a person is aware of their body they don't need too much more instruction than what Patanjali wrote. Some teachers create dependence by creating fear about getting hurt if a person doesn't get the "proper" teaching (paying them more money). Everybody breaths. Everybody can play with their breath and learn. The body will teach.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Tue Apr 10, 2012 2:37 am

Thanks Soupbone! I've been following your blog for a while. It is really good. I love that clip you put up on on Feb 21 "You have to see it to believe it." That guy's counters to getting thrown are amazing.

am
qigong
bagua basic exercises x50 each
Sun Bagua form x2
shiko x50 with arms to straight out to sides
sumo walk
slow sumo squat with heels together
slow pushups hands, fists, then spider pushups
sitting scissor position, touch opposite hand and foot x100
slow leg raises
uddiyana bandha x4 or so
pranayama

I'm trying to stay relaxed during the slow work. I find that my face will start to have tension as the work gets harder. I try to relax my face/eyes when I become aware of the tension. The same goes for pranayama.

pm
qigong + one legged bagua guard position stance hold
walk

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Wed Apr 11, 2012 4:00 am

am
qigong
Sun Bagua basic exercises x50
Sun Bagua form x6
wall push
pranayama- felt a little off today. Did alternate nostril breathing. Still focusing on keeping face/eyes relaxed. I found that putting my middle finger between the eyebrows helped considerably while doing the alternate nostril breathing. Patanjali talks about concentration on different things both interior and exterior. When putting the mind on an area of the body I find that my eyes tend to look towards that direction. This sometimes causes tension. Placing a finger between the brows allows me to focus my mind on the tactile sensation of the area. This served to relieve facial/eye tension and allow for increased concentration.
ice water douse
horsestance

pm
qigong
shoulder joint mobility exercises
walk

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Thu Apr 12, 2012 5:05 am

am
qigong
Sun Bagua 8 basic exercises x50
Sun Bagua form x4
shiko
pranayama (retention only on exhale plus 3 main locks)
cold water douse
horsestance 1min

pm
qigong
50 pushups varying breathing and speed of movement
walk

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Re: Misogi

Post by odin » Thu Apr 12, 2012 5:47 am

the observation about the teachers creating a dependence is a very good one! When I started looking into this stuff, I kind of intuitively felt that we all had the same tools, (ie a body) and we were each the chief expert of our own exerpience. Then you read more stuff and start thinking you need a bona fide 'master' to guide you at all times or you're screwed. As with a lot of artistic or physical endeavours, a bit of guidance can be useful at times, but ultimately I think you need to develop things for yourself, based on your own experience. We also live in anage where good teaching is available remotely - thanks to stuff lke the internet & youtube of all things! This is a vast improvement even on 20 years ago, where you were limited to real life teachers or books.

I currently like listening to some of the neo-advaita teachers, partly because they do such a good job of cutting through some of the bullshit that surrounds spiritual practice. Anyway, sorry for cluttering your log.

Do you find any conflict between the yogic stuff & the qigong stuff btw?
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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Fri Apr 13, 2012 2:22 am

odin wrote:the observation about the teachers creating a dependence is a very good one! When I started looking into this stuff, I kind of intuitively felt that we all had the same tools, (ie a body) and we were each the chief expert of our own exerpience. Then you read more stuff and start thinking you need a bona fide 'master' to guide you at all times or you're screwed. As with a lot of artistic or physical endeavours, a bit of guidance can be useful at times, but ultimately I think you need to develop things for yourself, based on your own experience. We also live in anage where good teaching is available remotely - thanks to stuff lke the internet & youtube of all things! This is a vast improvement even on 20 years ago, where you were limited to real life teachers or books.

I currently like listening to some of the neo-advaita teachers, partly because they do such a good job of cutting through some of the bullshit that surrounds spiritual practice. Anyway, sorry for cluttering your log.

Do you find any conflict between the yogic stuff & the qigong stuff btw?
Thanks Odin...Definitely not cluttering up my log. I appreciate the discussion. I was just discussing yoga with a woman who practiced for years. I asked her about her experiences with pranayama and she kept telling me about what a teacher said. I wasn't interested in that kind of info, I can get that in books. It turns out that she was afraid to do pranayama do to all the "danger" talk. She said that a person has to wait 2 hours after practicing pranayama to eat and was flabbergasted when I told her that sometimes I eat 15 minutes after practicing. The way I figure, if my body is hungry I should eat. Some qigong people say that a person shouldn't micturate or defecate for about 15 minutes after doing qigong or a person will "lose qi." A guy at a seminar I went to almost pissed himself. I think this is nonsense.

On a somewhat related note...Years ago I found a banjo in a thrift store for $19.95. I always wanted to play one but didn't have the cash. I was excited to learn to play so I went to an instrument shop and asked the crusty old guy working if he knew of anyone that teaches banjo lessons. He mean mugged me and asked, "What the fuck do you want banjo lessons for?" I explained that I wanted to learn to play the banjo. He replied, "You just play the goddamn thing. Do you think the applacian hillbillies took banjo lessons? Fuck No! They just played the goddamn thing. Just play it and you will learn." That hit home. I just played the goddamned thing and ended up playing banjo (and accordion...just picked up that goddamned thing too) in a popular indie rock band in Denver. Got to tour across the country, play red rocks ampitheater, recorded 3 albums, it was great. It all happened because I learned to get out of my own way and just do it even if I suck. In truth, I never played banjo or accordion all that well but one doesn't have to be Bela Fleck to make good sounds with fellow whiskey guzzling musicians. All in all, I am my biggest impediment and I just keep trying to reduce the friction a little bit everyday.

Re: qigong and yogic stuff conflicting? I haven't experienced any problems. They seem to work different aspects of the body/mind and in a way that I feel can be complementary. Xian sent me some really interesting quotes by some famous freedivers that experimented with pranayama and standing qigong methods. I will post the material shortly.

am
qigong
pranayama worked the exhale retention and locks.
Sun basic exercises x50 each
Sun Bagua form x4 with some one legged posture holding.
wall pushes
pushup hold position x2 (at the top of range...just feeling how the force moves through my body)
shiko
slow squats

pm
qigong
walk

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Sat Apr 14, 2012 2:47 am

am
qigong
pranayama no retention. slow breath down to approx. 2 breaths per 1.5 minutes
Sun Bagua basics x50 each
Sun Bagua Form x4
wall push
horse stance
shiko
one legged bagua guard stance posture hold

pm
qigong
cold water douse
horsestance
breath retention
1st attempt, slowed down breathing considerably for 5 minutes. Sped breathing up for 1 minute and retention for 2:32 seconds. This attempt went easy for the first 1.5 minutes, then an overwhelming sense of fear came over me. I made it through the first wave then there was a short pause and another wave of more intense fear hit me. I went into it and then succumbed to it. Physically my body hadn't entered the phase of diaphragmatic spasms. After effect was calm and recovery was finished in a few breaths. Very calm. Breathing slowed.
2nd attempt. This attempt I sped my breathing up for about 4 breaths and then held for 3:04. The sense of fear didn't come up this time. Keeping the eyes closed makes it easier. When I open my eyes I can feel the hold get tougher. I wonder if the first attempt caused my spleen to contract and release more red blood cells making this attempt easier.
3rd attempt. 2:30 I didn't hit severe spasms but had some fear come up again. It was weird and sapped my strength. My mind kept messing with me.
I felt extremely relaxed after this.

Walk

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Tue Apr 17, 2012 4:00 am

Sat.
am
qigong
ice water douse
horsestance 1 min low

pm
breath retention 3:34

Sun.
qigong
ice water douse
horsestance

Mon
qigong
Sun Bagua 8 basic exercises x50
Sun Bagua form x4 or 5
wall push, horsestance, shiko
pranayama

pm
qigong
later on did pranayama

Over the weekend I was thinking about how convoluted pranayama can be. Often simplicity leads to better results. Today I did pranayama in the the following way.
Lie supine
Naturally breath in 80% of full lung capacity. This prevents straining and seems to let the mind relax.
Relax and allow breath to be pushed out by the relaxation.
At first there is no or minimal pause between the inhale and exhale.
After a while retention happens automatically. This time it happened on the exhale.
I felt two drops in tension that led deeper into silence while doing this each time.
I felt a shiver up and down my spine naturally occur with the breath. This feeling eventually expanded to my arms and legs.

I was very relaxed after each session. Circulation felt stronger.

So far I've found that both this method and extended breath retentions to yield positive results. Long breath retention is done through force of will. The method today is opposite of force of will. I think they are complementary.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Xian » Tue Apr 17, 2012 4:43 am

Have you tried to do the willful pranayama immediately after the more natural kind? I would suspect that you would be able to go much deeper after the initial relaxation.

Nice little video from a yogi at a freediving workshop (are you going to post those quotes btw?):
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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:15 am

Thanks for reminding me. I meant to post them this weekend but tax time got to me. Nice video btw...Thanks!

These quotes were compiled by Xian. The quotes contain some very interesting information concerning the effects of pranayama and standing qigong by a top level freediver.
Erik Fattah wrote:
The following is from MY OWN experience and does not necessarily apply to others:

I can offer a comparison of the most powerful exercise of each discipline [Qigong and Yoga), i.e. zhan zhuang vs. pranayama.

First of all, each one only gives significant benefits if practiced for a significant amount of time per day. With pranayama, good benefits begin once you start practicing for 30 minutes per day. For zhan zhuang, 30 minutes is also good, but you really need 45-90 minutes for maximum effect. I have done pranayama for up to 60 minutes per day, and do notice that it helps me more than 30 minutes per day, but in general I think that pranayama works faster than zhan zhuang, minute for minute, also mainly because pranayama does not require long warm up and cool down routines -- for 30 minute zhan-zhuang sessions you're looking at 15 minutes of warm up and 15 minutes of cool down, making time a real issue, especially since you really need 45 minutes of standing at least.

The following is from MY OWN experience and does not necessarily apply to others:

benefits of pranayama, if practiced at > 10:40:20 for > 30min per day:
- Increased vital capacity with and without packing (This, for some extremely strange reason, stretches my chest/lungs way more than pack stretches or more traditional exercises.)
- Decreased residual volume (i.e. deeper equalizing)
- Increased CO2 tolerance
- Moderately improved breath-hold ability
- Improved immune system (this is the main benefit)
- Decreased mental noise (i.e. meditation effect)
- Possible negative effect: blood pressure decreases significantly after extended practice, which further increases static apnea but might cause premature blackouts in the ocean
- If you can do 16:64:32 for 10 hours per day for 3 months, according to the yogis you should be able to do 13min+ breath holds
- Benefits begin only days after you start
- Maximum benefit requires praticing with back straight, sitting in half-lotus or lotus position

benefits of chi-gong (zhan-zhuang), if practiced for > 45 min per day, with 15min warm up and 15 min cool down
- No effect on lung capacity, residual volume or CO2 tolerance
- Massive decrease in neuromuscular tension (i.e. muscles at rest are more relaxed and consume less O2)
- Increased dive times, increased breath-holds, especially if breath-holding or diving is done within 24 hours of zhan-zhuang
- Struggle phase of breath-hold feels much more enjoyable
- Improved immune system
- Massively decreased mental noise (if practiced excessively it leads to the 'hermit syndrome' where all you want to do is be a hermit!)
- Must be done outside for real benefit
- Can't sleep well if done in evening
- Benefits can take up to 2 months to start showing up

I once did an experiment where I did 60 minutes of pranayama, and then tried doing statics after. I also tried doing 1.5h of zhan-zhuang and also did statics. I did this several times, back and forth, over several days. After the pranayama I could always hit 6:00-6:05, but no more. After zhan-zhuang I could always hit 6:22-6:26, and it felt very pleasant. Also, diving the day after chi-gong would always result in good dives. In fact, most of my static pb's were done immediately after chi-gong. The main problem with zhan-zhuang chi-gong is that you must do it early in the morning, or at latest mid-day, or else you can't sleep (this does not apply to other types of chi-gong where you perform breathing and/or movement exercises).

In the old days, I used to do a 3-hour routine, which began with the 16 warm-up exercises from the book 'Xing-Yi Nei Gong'. This would take about 20 minutes. Then I would do the 108 move combined wu/yang style tai chi form, twice, each time taking about 7 minutes.
Then, I would do 1h30 of standing meditation. Then I would do a push-hands exercise, followed by a cool down sequence. I would finish with a sitting meditation for about 30 minutes. With the standing meditation, you *really* need to do a sitting meditation afterwards, otherwise you get hit with side effects (twitchy energy, uncontrolled libido, inability to sleep, etc.)

Chi-Gong Standing meditation and HARD pranayama produces very similar effects & side effects, when it comes to your nervous system.
However, the chi-gong has dramatic muscular effects (improved neuromuscular coordination and increased power generation, as well as reduced neuromuscular tension).
The chi-gong, for those reasons, works wonderfully for static as well as diving. However, it gives no ability to resist CO2 and it does not thicken your blood (increase hemoglobin).
The pranayama increases your CO2 tolerance and increases hemoglobin (if done hard enough). Interestingly, both chi-gong standing and pranayama make contractions feel really good.

I woul say standing meditation is psychologically easier to perform, because to get the same results with pranayama requires very excruciating cycle times and tremendous concentration.

aka
6 cycles of hard bhastrika (20:200:40)
equals
30 minutes of nadi shodhana (16:64:32)
equals
60-90 min of standing meditation

When practicing intense pranayama, signs of unanticipated kundalini include:
- Random twitching of various body parts, primarily fingers, toes, the head/neck and upper torso
- Sensations of heat or cold or fiery tingling in various parts of the body
- Getting extremely hot or sweating all over the body (during the exercise)
- Sensations of pressure, heat or burning in the perineum area
- Strange outbursts of emotion, in particular rage, anger or gruesome thoughts (these pass once imbalances are dissolved)
- Massive fluctuations (high or low) in libido; this may occur during the breath-hold, or at any other random time

In order to actually reach the point where these symptoms appear, you generally have to do alternate nostril pranayama in the ratio of 10:40:20 or more.
At the ratio of 10:40:20, it will take quite a while for the symptoms to appear in most people. At the ratio of 16:64:32, the symptoms may appear in a matter of days.
It is important to know that during inhalation and exhalation, the diaphragm must do the work.
If you use the mouth or throat to 'pinch' the air flow (thus regulating the speed), then you will derive little or no benefit from the exercise.

Other pranayama exercises such as bhastrika with retention, or any pranayama which involves breath retention, can lead to the symptoms.
This is particularly true of any pranayama exercise in which you are doing a slow, controlled exhalation, and/or performing the bandhas during the apnea or during the exhale.

In terms of benefits of pranayama for freediving:
- Pranayama has a general balancing effect which can make regular apnea more enjoyable, with controlled, comfortable contractions
- Pranayama (for me) produces a drastic increase in exercise capacity (both aerobic and anaerobic)
- To actually prolong your static apnea by means of pranayama, generally requires intense practice for months, passing through all the above symptoms, until all of the symptoms disappear.
At that point you should notice a dramatically reduced need to breathe in general, decreased metabolic rate and dramatically reduced resting body temperature.

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Re: Misogi

Post by Bedlam 0-0-0 » Wed Apr 18, 2012 3:58 am

am
qigong
Sun Bagua basic exercises x50 each
Sun Bagua x4 with one legged stance holding intermixed.
horsestance
shiko
slow pushups, leg raises
scissor position touch opposite hand and foot x50
ice water douse
pranayama

pm
qigong
standing forward bend, seated one leg forward bend , legs spread forward bend, cow pose, baddha konasana/forward bend
corpse pose with pranayama
In light on Yoga Iyengar states that corpse pose is one of the most difficult to master even though it is the simplest. This always stuck out to me as an important statement.
"Lying flat on the ground like a corpse...destroys fatigue and quiets the agitation of the mind."
"To tame Prana depends upon the nerves. Steady smooth fine and deep breathing without any jerky motions of the body soothes the nerves and calms the mind. The stresses of modern civilization are a strain on the nerves for which savasana (corpse pose) is the best antidote." -Light on Yoga.

Originally it appears that there few asanas. Krishnamachyra/Iyengar/Jois seem to have brought more gymnastic/athletic component to yoga and asanas were added. Are all these poses needed? Focusing on perfect alignment can be beneficial but at a certain point it prevents deeper levels of relaxation as the critical mind is always involving itself in the process. Is "feeling the stretch" and pushing it as important or beneficial as moving into a position and turning the mind into a receiver that observes the phenomena happening and thereby allowing the body to release levels of tension...

So with that in mind I did some "asanas" but didn't try to stretch. Just sat in them until I felt I hit my natural level of plasticity/relaxation in that position for the day. My tension levels dropped dramatically. I stayed lying on the ground after doing pranayama and slipped into a weird deep level of relaxation. It was like being asleep but awake simultaneously. When I snapped out of it I was so relaxed that I felt like going to sleep. I took 10 minutes to stand up. I don't think humans are built to cope with the modern stresses of society. Our sympathetic nervous system response is triggered constantly at low levels by bills, jerkbags, fucked up news, work and living situations and we can't run away or smash shit. I think this stuff just keeps adding up like microtraumas to a person's psyche. If we are under these constant stresses it seems reasonable to think that our range of parasympathetic nervous system response may decrease. Maybe something as simple as lying on the floor/breathing/relaxing ala Benson/yoga/meditation etc is a way to restore a person's range.

Here is a good article by Tom Bisio on qigong. http://www.internalartsinternational.co ... ern-times/

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odin
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Re: Misogi

Post by odin » Wed Apr 18, 2012 12:04 pm

a very informative post by that free-diver - helps clarify a couple of choices I'm making myself so timely.

Re the asana, here is a translation of the oldest (?) extant hatha yoga text: http://www.swamij.com/hatha-yoga-pradipika.htm

There were very few postures in comparison to today's market. There's an interesting article on that same site about this. I personally don't think some of the longer routines are beneficial, I think it is where yoga 'jumps the shark' and turns into a pseudo-spiritual, watery mess... Some postures are good for physical health, and some are good for sitting, and physical health is a great asset to meditation, but this does not equate to 90 mins of postures imo.
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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Re: Misogi

Post by Soupbone » Wed Apr 18, 2012 3:52 pm

I really do enjoy reading this log. It has great information and stuff that I try to implement daily.
I just started a blog called The Happy Grappler. Check it out at http://happygrappler.blogspot.com

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