Review of Kubik's "Dinosaur Bodyweight Training"

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Shafpocalypse Now
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Review of Kubik's "Dinosaur Bodyweight Training"

Post by Shafpocalypse Now » Tue Apr 25, 2006 12:31 pm

Original link:

http://powerandbulk.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=10028

Ian McKown is a guy I've known a long time, online. He used to run Primordial Power, a ezboard that discussed a lot of the stuff that was in Kubik's original "Dinosaur Training"


[quote]
A friend gave me a copy to peruse awhile ago, but I only wrote this up today.


I guess I should note right off the bat that I’m not always the best at keeping coherent lines of thought, but bear with me and hopefully this will be only a little painful.

First off, I was a little surprised at the length of the main program. It tops out at just over 200 pages. I don’t know for sure why I was expecting a flimsy handout, but it’s pretty big.

It starts off with Brooks thanking you for purchasing the program. He should. The introduction is positive, and filled with encouragement.

The next few pages are the type of stories where the author tells you about how someone overcame adversity only to become a hero, president, or even Matt Furey or Brooks Kubik. Comparing Teddy Roosevelt to Furey is a little over the top, but I guess Brooks is trying to inspire the reader.

I sort of liked the next part of the book. Brooks does a little guided introspection, and some focus exercises. I think the main goal is to get people to believe that no matter whatever they need to accomplish, if they put their minds to it, they will succeed. I like that, and even though Brooks’ rhetoric can be a little pungent, I think that it is some good stuff. I should point out that Brooks’ comparing what he is selling to what people like Doug Hepburn did is a little ridiculous.

Skipping right along, the main points before the main exercises are to have a positive mental attitude, to cultivate the burning desire and to believe in yourself. These are all great things, and I think most people would agree that DT was great for the mental aspects of training. This is much the same.

I don’t agree with Brooks’ assertion that “less equipment is moreâ€

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Post by Abandoned by Wolves » Wed Apr 26, 2006 1:27 pm

Nice review, thanks for posting.

Interesting that Bryce Lane sells you a slim little pamphlet of BW exercises for $12 that is easily worth twice that, and Brooks, influenced by Furey, will sell you an overinflated package for hundreds that isn't worth 1/10 that.

Hmmmm.
"I also think training like a Navy S.E.A.L. is stupid for the average person. I would say PT like an infantry unit, run, body weight stuff, hump a little, a little weights and enjoy life if you are not training for specifics." -tough old man

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Post by Shafpocalypse Now » Wed Apr 26, 2006 8:21 pm

A guy I know on the P&B has sent me the course to check out.

I am kind of sitting on it, and not sure I'm going to comment, because my opinion is more like Bryce's.

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Post by Fat Cat » Wed Apr 26, 2006 8:54 pm

Personally, I like the course. There is a very clear and thorough progression through various movement groups (pushups through handstand pushups, bodweight rows through ring training, etc.) and Brooks provides some fifty or so different routines to choose from. Certainly, if you took these exercises and programs and put yourself into them, you would achieve impressive results. My only gripe with the Dinosaur Bodweight Training course is the price. I would personally like to see this kind of information available for a much lower price. Is it worth it? Only time will tell.

As for comparisons with Enamait and others; generally I think this misses the mark, and I am a big fan of Ross. Ross markets conditioning materials for sportsmen; Brooks' book is geared towards the bodyweight strength-feat enthusiast and he covers much more complex drills than are appropriate for Ross' market. JMO...but I'm right.
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Post by Shafpocalypse Now » Wed Apr 26, 2006 9:06 pm

Kubik seems to have a problem with spinal flexibility.
He also seems to have some problem with dips.

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