IGX "...overflowing with foulmouthed ignorance."

IGX "...overflowing with foulmouthed ignorance."
It is currently Fri Dec 14, 2018 5:11 am

<


All times are UTC




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:19 am 
Offline
Top
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:01 pm
Posts: 1692
After a few months trying to get both my parents out of the couch, I was able to convince them to go for a walk daily and to loosely follow Maxwell's Daily Dozen.

Is there anything along those lines better suited for older people? I tried to make them do goblet squats and bulgarian goat bag swings, but I don't think they are there yet.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 1:01 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant

Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:53 pm
Posts: 381
Quote:
After a few months trying to get both my parents out of the couch, I was able to convince them to go for a walk daily and to loosely follow Maxwell's Daily Dozen.

Is there anything along those lines better suited for older people? I tried to make them do goblet squats and bulgarian goat bag swings, but I don't think they are there yet.
I have my older client's do a simple warm-up based on Pavel's stuff. They start with wrists and ankles and move toward the hips. Roll the wrists in and put, ankles in and out, shake the elbows and bend them, shake the knees and bend them, lift the knees, roll the neck and shoulders bth directions, finish with some hula hoop type movements then the pelvic clock.

We then work immediately on balance. I prefer them to do this barefoot or in Chuck Taylor's, but whatever. Stand on one leg for 10 seconds, switch legs. Three times each leg. Gradually work up to one minute with eyes closed.

My very basic workout for old folks is step ups, rack pulls,, and wall push ups/one arm press. Step ups are done onto something which is the height of a stair. We'll move toward box squats and goblet squats, though be squats first. If I can get the there, and many do get there, I want to progress toward a basic 5-3-1 using press instead of bench with a single assistance exercise each day and tons of mobility work. For explosive strength, we throw med balls or stability balls. We also do some twisting core work and always sleep one leg work in the mix.

Our stretching routine is now based on the "Seven Steps to Release the psoas"and basic shoulder rehab stuff with some cat stretches thrown in the mix.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 1:43 pm 
Offline
Top
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:01 pm
Posts: 1692
Quote:
I have my older client's do a simple warm-up based on Pavel's stuff. They start with wrists and ankles and move toward the hips. Roll the wrists in and put, ankles in and out, shake the elbows and bend them, shake the knees and bend them, lift the knees, roll the neck and shoulders bth directions, finish with some hula hoop type movements then the pelvic clock.

We then work immediately on balance. I prefer them to do this barefoot or in Chuck Taylor's, but whatever. Stand on one leg for 10 seconds, switch legs. Three times each leg. Gradually work up to one minute with eyes closed.

My very basic workout for old folks is step ups, rack pulls,, and wall push ups/one arm press. Step ups are done onto something which is the height of a stair. We'll move toward box squats and goblet squats, though be squats first. If I can get the there, and many do get there, I want to progress toward a basic 5-3-1 using press instead of bench with a single assistance exercise each day and tons of mobility work. For explosive strength, we throw med balls or stability balls. We also do some twisting core work and always sleep one leg work in the mix.

Our stretching routine is now based on the "Seven Steps to Release the psoas"and basic shoulder rehab stuff with some cat stretches thrown in the mix.
Thanks man, I appreciate it.

Just curious... How old are your clients? I don't know if my parents could do something like rack pulls or step ups.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 4:54 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding

Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 3:46 am
Posts: 9806
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
I have a 5 dollar ebook on it. Lots of satisfied customers.

_________________
"There is only one God, and he doesn't dress like that". - - Captain America


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:56 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant

Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:53 pm
Posts: 381
Quote:
Quote:
I have my older client's do a simple warm-up based on Pavel's stuff. They start with wrists and ankles and move toward the hips. Roll the wrists in and put, ankles in and out, shake the elbows and bend them, shake the knees and bend them, lift the knees, roll the neck and shoulders bth directions, finish with some hula hoop type movements then the pelvic clock.

We then work immediately on balance. I prefer them to do this barefoot or in Chuck Taylor's, but whatever. Stand on one leg for 10 seconds, switch legs. Three times each leg. Gradually work up to one minute with eyes closed.

My very basic workout for old folks is step ups, rack pulls,, and wall push ups/one arm press. Step ups are done onto something which is the height of a stair. We'll move toward box squats and goblet squats, though be squats first. If I can get the there, and many do get there, I want to progress toward a basic 5-3-1 using press instead of bench with a single assistance exercise each day and tons of mobility work. For explosive strength, we throw med balls or stability balls. We also do some twisting core work and always sleep one leg work in the mix.

Our stretching routine is now based on the "Seven Steps to Release the psoas"and basic shoulder rehab stuff with some cat stretches thrown in the mix.
Thanks man, I appreciate it.

Just curious... How old are your clients? I don't know if my parents could do something like rack pulls or step ups.
The oldest woman I work with is 83, I have a 77 year old man I train 2x/ week. Old people have money.

I do this routine with anyone who looks frail and is older than 40. Sometimes my clients end up doing snatches, cleans, deads, atlas stones,etc. into their 50s; some never progress beyond a box squat onto a bench. Much of it dends on their life outside the gym. If they walk,garden, bowl, whatever, they go further. If they come into the gym and complain about how hard it is, and constantly tell me they don't like it, then they tend to lag behind.

The step ups start with no weight; I want to make sure they can climb stairs properly ( many older folks put their foot on the upper step and grab the railing and pull themselves until their leg is straight, or they lean forward until their back leg gets high enough to slap dwn on the stair. I want them to put their foot flat, drive forward on it, them extend heir hip and knee to get up the stair.

Rack pulls are the next thing because people constantly pick up shit from a table or counter wrong. I want to teach the folks to use their hips when they lift and to bring the weight, or box, or tray, close to their body. Additionally, rack pulls strengthen everything about the back without the awkwardness of negotiating the knees. Our pulls get lowers time goes on, and hopefully end up as proper deadlifts.

My basic goal for older, untrained folks is to get them to move however I can, then improve postural strength.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:04 pm 
Offline
Lifetime IGer

Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 5:39 pm
Posts: 19065
Old people are so rewarding to train. The ones trying to get healthy and move better nearly always have their shit so dialed in.

_________________
"He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that." JS Mill


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:05 pm 
Offline
Gunny

Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2009 9:59 pm
Posts: 961
Helping "old" people really needs expanded on. How old - and how limited are we talking about? When I retired from the Post Office I was asked to do maintenance at a Senior Center with ages from around 60 to close to 100. There is training someone in preparation for getting older who is still highly trainable and then there is training someone who "is" older and the common training ideas are way too serious for these people - regardless of actual years on earth age. One of the problems is that many of the people coming up with "how to train the elderly" aren't elderly enough themselves and have no concept of the limitations and issues the elderly face. Oh sure - you can take the average 50 year old and do all kinds of things with them and this will certainly help them as they age further - but try that with someone who is 75 already and you can easily do some serious harm to them - depending on the individual of course. The average trainer in a gym today doesn't have the ability to train a 25 year old without harm - and the things they try with the actual elderly are criminal. If I was forced to pick one thing for the actual elderly to do (and of course we aren't forced to do that) - I'd choose something like Tai Chi - at least in the beginning. But judging from what was an admittedly very small population where I worked - they liked dancing more than anything else I could show them. All these wonderful training ideas kind of fall apart when the person is unable to get out of their chair without help - there is old and then there is old - two different things entirely. One of the biggest problems in training the truly elderly is getting them to a facility where the things I Love Big Chicks talks about are possible equipment wise. For example the place where I worked had no training facility at all and many ladies in their 80s and 90s also couldn't drive - so what we had was a "commons" area with zero equipment to work with. The social aspect of group training also encouraged many who otherwise wouldn't even try.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:10 pm 
Offline
Lifetime IGer

Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 5:39 pm
Posts: 19065
I grok...completely.

50 old is not old. 70 and up is getting there and requires a great deal of judgement than most people never get to develop. There's a big big difference between age and disability. I've trained with 40 year olds that hard far more limitations than some of the 70 plus folks. Across the board, coming up with alternatives that are safe and effective can be bone simple if you let it be.

I don;t mean to derail this thread? We can start a new one that's more generic

_________________
"He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that." JS Mill


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:25 pm 
Offline
Top
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:01 pm
Posts: 1692
Quote:
I don;t mean to derail this thread? We can start a new one that's more generic
No, please, continue. This thread is pure gold.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:07 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant

Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:53 pm
Posts: 381
Quote:
Helping "old" people really needs expanded on. How old - and how limited are we talking about? When I retired from the Post Office I was asked to do maintenance at a Senior Center with ages from around 60 to close to 100. There is training someone in preparation for getting older who is still highly trainable and then there is training someone who "is" older and the common training ideas are way too serious for these people - regardless of actual years on earth age. One of the problems is that many of the people coming up with "how to train the elderly" aren't elderly enough themselves and have no concept of the limitations and issues the elderly face. Oh sure - you can take the average 50 year old and do all kinds of things with them and this will certainly help them as they age further - but try that with someone who is 75 already and you can easily do some serious harm to them - depending on the individual of course. The average trainer in a gym today doesn't have the ability to train a 25 year old without harm - and the things they try with the actual elderly are criminal. If I was forced to pick one thing for the actual elderly to do (and of course we aren't forced to do that) - I'd choose something like Tai Chi - at least in the beginning. But judging from what was an admittedly very small population where I worked - they liked dancing more than anything else I could show them. All these wonderful training ideas kind of fall apart when the person is unable to get out of their chair without help - there is old and then there is old - two different things entirely. One of the biggest problems in training the truly elderly is getting them to a facility where the things I Love Big Chicks talks about are possible equipment wise. For example the place where I worked had no training facility at all and many ladies in their 80s and 90s also couldn't drive - so what we had was a "commons" area with zero equipment to work with. The social aspect of group training also encouraged many who otherwise wouldn't even try.
Old is entirely as relative term. That's why, above, I mentioned "frail". Some older people, 40 and up, usually 50 and up, have no concept of heavy, of moving well, of doing anything with their bodies at all, and, like Climber511 says, they can't get up out of a chair. I always evaluate the folks I'll train based on their ability to do normal, everyday tasks- and then see where I go from there.

The things I consider are:

Balance
Ability to walk 1/4 mile or so on a sidewalk
The ability to get up and sit down repeatedly (three times in a row)
how rounded their backs are (rounding between the shoulder blades)
how bad their pelvic tilt is and whether it's anterior or posterior.

I also need notes from their Doctor about what they can and cannot do. I spend most of my training time with older folks trying to correct years of horrible posture. And again, I say older because I don't know whether older is 45 or 80; it's more a factor of detrained/untrained.

I will say that swimming doesn't keep these old folks in shape at all. I go to the Y once or twice a week with my daughter and all the older folks who swim, even for 30 minutes or more at a stretch, look like hell. Bad posture, fat, hardly any muscle tone at all.

But dancing is pretty popular for the older people, and dancing, moving, maybe some basic bodyweight stuff is great. Do push-ups on a wall, just use a chair to sit up and get down, etc.


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:11 pm 
Offline
Gunny

Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2009 9:59 pm
Posts: 961
Pretty much as said above - these are things that become so vitally important with them

• Have enough balance (and strength) to not fall when moving around – the number one danger for the elderly
• Be able to stand up after sitting in a chair - without pulling something over trying to stand up with their arms
• Having enough strength to climb stairs – even a few of them – especially if there is no handrail for them to pull on
• Enough strength and flexibility to get down and get a can out of the bottom cupboard – and then get back up again – without tearing off the cupboard doors pulling on them in the process - usually resulting in a fall
• Get into and out of the bathtub without falling – or up off the toilet without help
• Be able to get up from the floor
• Get into and out of their car
• The ability to walk short distances to and from their car to the house with a bag a groceries etc – sometimes with a cane
• The ability to crawl from where they have fallen to the phone to call for help


Getting up off the floor and/or getting to the phone after a fall is a life skill! The key in my mind at least is to start them young enough to be able to develop the necessary skills and strengths - then try to maintain them over the years. Training someone who is already nearly in-firmed is very difficult


Top
   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:24 pm 
Offline
Lifetime IGer

Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 5:39 pm
Posts: 19065
A common problem in all of S&C (which afflicts a vast number of otherwise sharp people) is that one should train towards an ideal set of abilities, rather than starting from the idea that we all needs to establish a set of strengths or competencies and gradually expand them, one chunk at a time.

One of the big mistakes I see people making when trying to work with the infirm or elderly is looking at all the stuff they can't do and seeing problems that need fixing rather than finding the things they CAN do and starting from there.

_________________
"He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that." JS Mill


Top
   
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 2:14 am 
Offline
Lifetime IGer
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2005 6:54 am
Posts: 20331
Location: Upon the eternal throne of the great Republic of Turdistan
Quote:
After a few months trying to get both my parents out of the couch, I was able to convince them to go for a walk daily and to loosely follow Maxwell's Daily Dozen.

Is there anything along those lines better suited for older people? I tried to make them do goblet squats and bulgarian goat bag swings, but I don't think they are there yet.
Walking works, especially if they do it at a brisk pace. If they like something more social, yoga and/or tai chi are good.

Another thing-- are they retired? If they are, there are usually a lot of people in their age group at the gym in the mornings. Depending on the gym, swimming and water aerobics are good options.

Once they get into the workout habit, they are probably more likely to be receptive to other S&C options.

_________________
"Liberalism is arbitrarily selective in its choice of whose dignity to champion." Adrian Vermeule


Top
   
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 3:08 am 
Offline
Lifetime IGer
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 04, 2005 11:26 pm
Posts: 21027
Like ILBC mentioned, I used to train in a community center with a pool and water exercise classes for seniors...they did look bad. Except a 70 year old guy who still did triathalons. He looked pretty damn good. In addition, my mom goes to,senior Zumba, and even the old guys love that


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 9:01 pm 
Offline
Font of All Wisdom, God Damn it
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2005 6:07 pm
Posts: 7626
Location: The Deep Blue Sea
Some good things here, especially for me as I approach 70.

Happily, I've maintained good strength for my age. I'm good at walking distances, up hills and backpacking.

What is distressing is that my balance has gone all to hell. Gave up rock climbing years ago. Am extremely careful getting in and out of the shower --- something I never had to think about until a few years ago.

I am hoping YRG will help with the balance issues and help me maintain strength.

_________________
Image


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 9:08 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding

Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 3:46 am
Posts: 9806
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Quote:
Some good things here, especially for me as I approach 70.

Happily, I've maintained good strength for my age. I'm good at walking distances, up hills and backpacking.

What is distressing is that my balance has gone all to hell. Gave up rock climbing years ago. Am extremely careful getting in and out of the shower --- something I never had to think about until a few years ago.

I am hoping YRG will help with the balance issues and help me maintain strength.
There are studies that show Tai Chi can aid this. That might balance your hiking. It will turn your entire body into a weapon as well.

_________________
"There is only one God, and he doesn't dress like that". - - Captain America


Top
   
PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:11 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Commanding
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2005 6:36 pm
Posts: 7756
This might be where fitness & longevity intersect.
Quote:
A simple test that assesses a person's ability to sit and rise from the floor has proven to be a very accurate predictor of mortality risk. The finding comes from a study, published in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention, by a group of researchers in Brazil.

A total of 2002 adults aged 51 to 80 participated in the study. The researchers timed how long it took them to sit up and then rise from the floor without any help. The median follow-up period was 6.3 years from the baseline test.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/254100.php





_________________
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

W.B. Yeats


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited