IGX "...overflowing with foulmouthed ignorance."

IGX "...overflowing with foulmouthed ignorance."
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 6:59 pm 
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I took me a while to figure this out, but the winners at meets were determined by who lifted the most rather than who trained the most.
It would be a quotable nugget if it wasn't such a smartass remark! The question is if the latter translates to the former. As far as I can gather the jury's been out for a long time.

No, the jury is not out, those who lift the most are the winners. I never had to present my training log to the judges before a meet.

But I digress.

What I was trying to say is that those lifters who focus on the lifts and some carefully chosen (and specific) assistance exercises usually do the best. By doing so, there is no need for more than two workouts per week. Too often we see closet bodybuilders masquerading as powerlifters spending 5-7 days a week in the gym doing this and that, yet, they never really get better at the lifts or do very well in meets. Make no mistake they look great and are fairly strong but on the platform where it counts it just ain't happening.

90 minutes twice a week for the lifts and 45 minutes twice a week for cardio-respiratory work is all you need. And I'm talking about warming up, doing your thing and showering.

One of the key factors that is seldom adhered to when training like that is nailing down your diet and rest. Those two things help more than most realize.

If you say that 90 minutes isn't enough, well, stop doing all the pre-hab, re-hab and foam roller dry humping and start lifting instead. I'm not saying to not do those things, it's just that if you have to do those things to lift, address them first before you lift in a meet.

You need to go boom, boom, boom in the gym. For example: skip rope to break a sweat, then do your squats, a press and a pull. Go home. Two days later: skip rope like before, bench heavy, put the bar on the floor and start doing deadlifts until you can't. Go home.

On two other days do what ever it is you do for "cardio" and stretching. Throw in some "core" work and then fuck off for three days.

Before all these programs, systems and philosophies started popping up for sale, things were a lot less complicated.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 7:08 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2005 3:46 am
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Location: Ft. Lauderdale
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I took me a while to figure this out, but the winners at meets were determined by who lifted the most rather than who trained the most.
It would be a quotable nugget if it wasn't such a smartass remark! The question is if the latter translates to the former. As far as I can gather the jury's been out for a long time.

No, the jury is not out, those who lift the most are the winners. I never had to present my training log to the judges before a meet.

But I digress.

What I was trying to say is that those lifters who focus on the lifts and some carefully chosen (and specific) assistance exercises usually do the best. By doing so, there is no need for more than two workouts per week. Too often we see closet bodybuilders masquerading as powerlifters spending 5-7 days a week in the gym doing this and that, yet, they never really get better at the lifts or do very well in meets. Make no mistake they look great and are fairly strong but on the platform where it counts it just ain't happening.

90 minutes twice a week for the lifts and 45 minutes twice a week for cardio-respiratory work is all you need. And I'm talking about warming up, doing your thing and showering.

One of the key factors that is seldom adhered to when training like that is nailing down your diet and rest. Those two things help more than most realize.

If you say that 90 minutes isn't enough, well, stop doing all the pre-hab, re-hab and foam roller dry humping and start lifting instead. I'm not saying to not do those things, it's just that if you have to do those things to lift, address them first before you lift in a meet.

You need to go boom, boom, boom in the gym. For example: skip rope to break a sweat, then do your squats, a press and a pull. Go home. Two days later: skip rope like before, bench heavy, put the bar on the floor and start doing deadlifts until you can't. Go home.

On two other days do what ever it is you do for "cardio" and stretching. Throw in some "core" work and then fuck off for three days.

Before all these programs, systems and philosophies started popping up for sale, things were a lot less complicated.
Very powerful and valid. Most the older generation had jobs that were physical as well, so you had limited recovery before you even hit the gym. Hence the Isaac Hayes Template/Dan Martin though process. Good stuff, Dan.

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"There is only one God, and he doesn't dress like that". - - Captain America


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 9:14 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 28, 2006 2:14 pm
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Thanks Tom.

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