STEVE MAXWELL: Collected Works

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STEVE MAXWELL: Collected Works

Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 8:54 pm

Too many good ideas not to be collected.
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Post by Grandpa's Spells » Tue Dec 27, 2005 8:57 pm

Healthy Knees for Grappling:

http://forum.dragondoor.com/training/message/348311%5C

Steve Says: "I have not always had healthy knees. For a time, I suffered double medial meniscal tears that caused a lot of pain and locking of my knees. I managed to get through highschool and college wrestling without any knee injuries. I attributed that primarily to doing a lot of barbell squats. I did several successful 20 rep squat cycles throughout my wrestling career. I ran into trouble in BJJ because of inflexibility. My knees were tight and stable, but not flexible enough to be comfortable in all the weird positions I would get into in jiujitsu. Yoga training helped mightily, but use caution and don't force the postures. Allow the body to slowly adapt. I would get to competitive with myself and others and try to force the postures.I believe that this was the source of my first meniscal problem. Make sure you are flexible enough to sit comfortably on your heels for extended periods and to stretch those hamstrings. Hip and groin flexibility also take the pressure off the knees when doing moves on the mat. Hindu squats are another important exercise for tendon strength. Build up slowly if you are new to them. One does not have to do extremely high reps to get great benefit. Work up to 200 in under 6 minutes. Keep the hamstrings strong with glute/ham raises.
Deadlifts and kettlebell swings are not enough. I describe a body weight, non apparatus exercise that I have used extensively with great results. Check out my post below on the glute/ham question. Single leg curl/hip raises on a stability ball or Power Wheel leg curlship raises are other excellent hamstring exercises. For strength, pistols are hard to beat. Keeping the feet, ankles and calf muscles strong also help support knee protection. Weak feet and ankles cause the stresses to go into the knees and hips. I like the single leg standing calf raise and the four corner balance drill for lower extremity conditioning. I wear neoprene knee sleeves for warmth and support. It's not that they are all that supportive, but they create a kinesthetic awareness of my knees when I am grappling. I like the open patella models. They seem to stay in place better with less sliding. I do not 'drop' to my knees on take downs or throws. That is a sure invitation to knee problems. A lot of high school and college wrestlers do it, but they are kids. They will eventually suffer. I use the Japanese squat tackling style for double and single attacks. There are plenty of other throws, trips and takedowns that do not involve dropping suddenly on your knee caps. Avoid all tournaments that allow twisting knee locks. This is a recipe for disaster. The knees are not very sensitive and by the time one taps on a knee submission, injury has already occured. twisting knee locks are maiming submissions that have no place in amatuer sport tournaments. If they include them, they might as well include punching, kicking, elbows and head butts. This is just my opinion, but it is based on long experience.
Steve Maxwell"

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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:00 pm

X-Vest Body Weight Conditioning:

Bodyweight plus 40 lb. X-vest--

1. hindu squats-24
2. hindu pushups-12
3. body weight rows-6 (this is done on straps made by Lifeline)
4. prone bridge on elbows-1 min. (plank pose)
5. wrestlers bridge- 1 min.
6. Lifeline heavy speed rope- 100 jumps

Steve Says:

"I repeated the circuit five times with only enough rest to grab a gulp of water here and there. At the end I stretched my back, groin and hamstrings. The extra weight of the vest enhanced the stretches and I got down really far on my front straddle. If you enjoy this type of strength/endurance training, give the X-vest workout a try.

I really like body weight exercises and combat conditioning. It makes my body feel really good. I see this typeof training as an extension of yoga. The movements flow really smooth and I envision a wave as I do the squats and pushups. I also enjoy circuit training for the cardio response it produces. I don't enjoy extremely high reps that eventually goes hand in hand with these type movements. One way to ovecome this problem is to make the workout more challenging by wearing a weight vest. My favorite is the X-vest.
It fits real snug and doesn't move around.The following is a very challenging and strenuous circuit that I performed while watching the Eagles game Sunday
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:06 pm

The Naked Traveller:

Steve Says:

You don't have to miss a beat with your strength training when traveling. You have at your disposal the best gym possible-your own body. Just a few of the strength moves you can do are, one arm pushups, handstand pushups, divebomber pushups, finger tip pushups, dips between chairs, door pullups, towel chins over a pipe, pole or tree limb, one arm towel rows on a door knob, body weight rows on a railing or broom handle between two chairs, one leg squats, front, back and side lunges, v-situps, janda situps, alternating knee to elbow, plank holds and all sorts of back arching type moves including neck bridges. For cardio,you can do hindu squats and pushups, rope skipping, stair climbing, jumping jacks for time or reps, split jumps, mountain climbers, burpees or 6 count squat thrusts etc. You can do straight sets or circuits. This is only the tip of the iceberg. Your only limit is the imagination. You are the gym.
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Post by Grandpa's Spells » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:08 pm

On Sandbags:

Steve Says:

I love sandbag workouts. At my grappling school, I keep a pile of bags made out of heavy canvas Brittish sea bags I bought at a military surplus store. I made a 25lber,50,75,85,100,115,125,135,150 and 200lbs.It's hard to get exact weights and sometimes there is leakage which changes the weight.My next project is to make a couple bags out of some old tire inner tubes that I cut up in various lenghts.
Some of my favorite execises are getups with the big bag(very cardio),full squats with the bag on one shoulder (man what a core builder), front squat to push press, bear hug squats, squats with a bag on top of my head,and reapeatedly deadlifting the heavy bag from the ankles and shouldering it(the bag can't touch the floor).I also like relays with a partner where one partner lifts and bear hugs the sandbag and walks down and back across the mat(we have a big space)while the other partner performs various pushup drills. We will vary the grips we use while carrying the sandbag such as only gripping it by the cloth,holding it up high on the waist with an overhand grip,curl grip carries,under one arm carries(like a giant football)and carrying it across the thighs deadlift style. Neck bridges are a real sandbag adventure. I like to hold a sand bag to my chest while performing front bridges and then flip over to a back bridge.I like the bags for an exercise I call rotational deadlifts.Start with the bag on the floor on your right side,turn and bend over, grasp the bag and stand erect with the bag facing front against your thighs. Now turn and rotate and touch the bag to the floor on the opposite side, outside your left foot. Repeat for desired reps. Dips, chins, and pullups are are a real challenge with a 25 to 50 lb. sandbag squeezed between the knees! Talk about irradiation. Pushups are quite productive with a sandbag balanced on the neck and shoulders.
These are some of my favorate drills and exercises. I have a lot cool routines that I would be happy to share if you are interested.I think the humble sandbag is one of the most vesatile training tools, ones imagination is the only limit.

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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:11 pm

Barbells & Bodyweight? Six Examples of Mixed Modality Workouts:

Here are some ideas for combining body weight exercise together with weight training implements.
WO1 Bench press, pullups, pistols, dead lifts and Janda situps
WO2 One arm pushups, dumbbell rows, sumo deadlifts, hanging leg raise
WO3 Weighted chinups, weighted dips, barbell squats, regular situps
Wo4 Military press, weighted pullups, double kettlebell swings, elbow plank
Wo5 Double kettlebell snatch, weighted pushups, body weight rows, full contact twist
WO6 Handstand pushups, L-seat pullups, weighted lunges, suit case deadlifts


Steve Says:

"I could go on and on with very productive mixed modality workouts. You get the idea. I have used all of the above."
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:15 pm

Two Whole-Body 24kg Kettlebell Workouts:

Steve Says:

You have set up some good routines for your goals.Your moniker,'juice' conotates steroids use. You may wish to reconsider and select a more appropriate screen name. A couple suggestions would be to add some basic pulls such as chinups or pullups or even a rowing motion to offset the large amount of presses in your routines. The cleans work the pulling muscles as do the snatches to an extent, but because they are ballistic in nature, not enough to offset the pressing volume. I would strongly advise the addition of a squating exercise. Pistols, KB hack squat or KB front squats. The kettlebell front squat to over head push press (aka thrusters) is an amazing strength/endurance, cardio conditioner. A fourth workout could be thrusters super-setted with pullups. Try doing 10 rounds of 10 thrusters with 24kg. and 5 body weight pullups. Do a set at the top of each minute (density style). This simple 20 minute workout will give you everything you are after. Another excellent workout combining all of the elements of conditioning with leg work would be renegade rows super setted with lunges or stair climbs. The renegade rows are basically rows done from a pushup position. Place two 24kgs KBs on the floor and get in a pushup or plank position over them by grasping the handles. Now do a pushup between the bells and row one to the shoulder. Do another pushup between the handles and row the other bell to the shoulder. That's one rep. Do not twist, turn the feet sideways or lift the butt up. Stay in a strict plank position throughout. Do five reps, get up and do 20 reverse lunges (10 each side). Step way back and touch the knee to the floor. Get the fornt thigh below parallel. Now do 10 more sets at the top of each minute. You can hold the bells anyway you wish for the lunges. I use the 'rack' position, but holding them at the sides is also great grip and trap work. Here are two very good leg and cardio workouts that you can add. Each only takes 20 minutes and both are total ass kickers.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:18 pm

6 Minute Ab Routine:

1. Pre-exhaust the abs with two sets of Janda sit-ups.
2. Then immediately do the get-up sit-ups (first half of the Turkish get-up) on both sides.
3. Finish with the plank pose on the hands or elbows for two minutes.

Steve Says:

The Janda sit-up is the best ab move to minimize hip flexor involvement. Try this routine for an amazing ab workout. It will balance the entire ab girdle; your entire abdominal core will be thouroughly worked in 6 minutes.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:21 pm

Weight Vest Exercises and Advice:

Steve Says:

The weight vest makes body weight exercises and calesthenics progressive. As chinups, dips, pullups and pushups become easier, the vest increases the amount of resistence thus making the movement harder again. I don't advocate running with a heavy vest. The impact on the supportive structures of the feet, ankles and knees recieve to much trauma. With walking, however, the impact is a lot less. You still must build up slowly. Don't go out the first day with 40 lbs. strapped to your body and try to walk 5 miles. You will risk serious over use injury. The weight of the vest is adjustable. Start with 5 or at the most 10 lbs. for the majority of your exercises. Here is a partial list of the exercise movements that I advocate with the the weight vest;
chinups, pullups, dips, pushups, squats, hindu squats, hindu pushups, dive bomber pushups, handstand pushups, renegade rows, bear crawls, one arm pushups, pistols, hanging leg raises, rope climbing, squat thrusts or burpees, mountain climbers (aka sprinters), calf raises, wrestler bridges, yoga sun salutations (ashtanga sun salutation B), walking, walking on the treadmill at 10' incline, lunges, lunges on the treadmill, climbing stairs, climbing the stair master, back extensions, pelvic raises, one leg pelvic raises, no hands getups from the floor, prone plank pose, side plank pose. These are enough to get you started. Start out light and build up. Use impeccable form on all movements. It makes no sense to add resistence to your body and use sloppy form.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:24 pm

My Body Flow Practice:

1. Explovsive Quad Squats
2. Swoops
3. Elevated Scorpions

Steve Says:

I use Body Flow a number of ways. Sometimes as a tension releaser after heavier work, especially after hard grappling training and sometimes as a stand alone workout. Body Flow can become a great strength/conditioning workout by itself. Try mixing explovsive quad squats with swoops and elevated scorpions for 20 minutes and you will see what I mean. It is very versatile and is offers a great deal of variety
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:27 pm

Clubbells & Kettlebells -- Different Tools for Different Purposes:

Steve Says:

Clubbells and kettlebells are both excellent for different reasons. I use clubbells for their specific strengthening effect on my hands, wrists, elbows and shoulders. They are one of the finest tools for the grappling arts. Kettlebells are great for back, leg, hamstring and shoulder power. Both are great for cardio and strength/endurance. But why limit oneself to one or the other? Clubbells can be used for swings and snatches and kettlebells can be used for circular movements just as a wrench can hammer a nail and a hammer can loosen a bolt. Both tools have their strengths as well as weakness. Front squats with clubbells are very awkward and hard to load while kettlebell front squats are user friendly because of their design. Heavy military presses are better with kettlebells because, once again, of leverage and design. But try swinging a kettlebell in a full mill or try doing pendulums with a kettlebell. Not a good idea unless you enjoy ripping your shoulders out of the socket. There are specific conditioning attributes that both give. It all depends on what you want and are trying to accomplish. It isn't either or. Mix them together all you want, but know why you are doing it.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:32 pm

Body Flow Is Ideal For Jiujitsu:

Steve Says:

The progression through these routines that you ask about is being able to do them with minimum effort and a complete release of stored tension. In all likelyhood, you will not be able to most of the drills in the begginning. As you progress, you coordination, breath control, mobility, suppleness and strength in the extreme ranges of motion will improve greatly. Body Flow is all about the ability to move. Pounding out snatches and doing presses and deadlifts is not going to help your martial movement.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:48 pm

Bark Yard Pullup Bar a la Home Depot:

Steve Says:

Go to a local Home Depot or plumbing supply store and buy galvanized steel plumbers pipe. You need three pipes, two 90 degree elbows and 12 bags of Quickcrete cement. The pipes should be about 1 inch and a quarter to 1 inch and a half. This will give you a great grip workout. You could get reducing elbows that accomodate two different diameter pipes if you desire a thinner grip for the horizontal bar. The formula for vertical supports is for every inch above ground, there should be 1 inch under. If you choose a seven foot vertical height, you would want a minimum of three and a half feet burried under ground. The cross bar should be about four to five feet wide. That should give you plenty of room. For hanging rings, you will need to go somewhat higher than for a simple pullup setup. Ideally, you would have two seperate apparatus. In order to get the bar high enough to clear your head on muscle ups, dips, crosses etc., it may be to high to comfortably jump up and do pullups. I built a rope climbing tower out of galvanized steel fence posts. They look like flag poles. I hung my rings from the 25' rope climbing tower with galvanized chain. My pullup bar is about three inches above my reach and I jump to grasp it. I like this set up because I can hang free for hanging leg raises or hip pullovers, but it is not so high that I have difficulty reaching it when I am loaded up for weighted chins or pullups. Try jumping up with a 32kg. kettlebell hanging from your waist. The bar needs to be low enough to grab when loaded. That is why I think you might want to consider another option for the rings. Perhaps a tree branch. Also, do not let the rings outside . The sun will destroy the straps.They will dry rot and break. For outdoor rings, dacron rope or galvanized chain is best. Install by digging your two holes the width of the cross piece. Screw the pipe together and place in the holes. The holes depth should be a third of the support pole length. Use some rope as a temporary guy wire to hold the apparatus in place while you throw the Quickcrete in the holes. Use a garden hose and soak the Quickcrete per directions. As the concrete sets up, use a level to keep it straight. Keep checking to adjust before it hardens.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:51 pm

Get Started With A High Intensity Cardio Sprint Program:

Steve Says:

The idea behind high intensity interval training is to tax the heart and vascular system by going anerobic. You say that went 90 to 100 % on the sprints. How do you know? Sprint protocols are extremely taxing and should be undertaken only by highly fit individuals that have slowly worked up to that intensity level. The fact that you complained of a headache demonstrates that you are exceeding your present capacity. You mentioned that you had not done this type of training for a number of years. One of the worst mistakes that you could make is to jump into a high intensity program without proper preparation. The best way is to build your aerobic base and slowly add build the intensity and number of sprints. In the beginning, you should rest double the time you performed the interval (1:2 work/rest ratio). That means that for each second that you sprinted, you rest double that amount. For example, a 20 second sprint followed by a 40 second rest. Slowly work up to a 1:1 work/rest ratio. Your eventual goal is a 2:1 work/rest ratio. If you cannot recover in the set rest time, then your intensity (exertion level) is to high. You want to set up the sprint protocol workout around a 5 to 15 minute time with a 5 minute warmup and 5 minute cool down on either end. Do as many sprints within that time zone that you can starting with the 1:2 work/rest ratio. Select a sprint duration time of between 10 sec. to 1:00. You can vary the interval time, but I suggest staying with the same time in the begginning. I prefer 20 sec. Try doing 10 , 20 second sprints with 40 seconds rest. That equals 10 minutes. When that becomes easy, stay at the same intensity(speed) and try to do the same thing,10 sprints, but cut your rest intervals to 1:1 (20 sec. work, 20 sec. rest). The workout now is 6:40 as oppossed to 10:00. Your goal is to do the same level of intensity at a 2:1 or 20 sec work and 10sec. rest. For 10 sprints, the total time is now 5 minutes. Always include a 5 min. warmup and 5 minute cool down.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:55 pm

An Entire Lower Body Mobility Conditioner:

Do the following 5 movements back to back with little or no rest.

1. 20 yoga squats- squat with arms overhead, bend forward with straight legs and grab your toes, back to squat and stand
2. 100 Hindu squats- should take about three minutes
3. 20 dragon twists (each side)- sit to floor
4. 20 cossack side lunges (each side)
5. 50 deck squats- touch your feet over you head to the floor as you roll back


Steve Says:

Of course one can mix and match flat foot squats, Hindu squats and dragon twists anyway they like. Flat foot squats done Amosov style or Chi Kung style are for knee, hip and low back mobility with some cardio benefit. For flat foot squats, I prefer deck squats (aka rock up squats) Hindu squats are knee strengtheners plus cardio. Dragon twists and dragon walks are for hip, knee, ilial/tibial band and spine. there is some overlap, but each movement has it's own particular benefits. If you couple these three with the cossack lunge stretch, you have a very complete program. Here is a great strength endurance program that will give you it all, strength/endurance, cardio and mobility. This routine is a fantastic conditioner for the entire lower body as well as being a good cardio workout.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 10:00 pm

Functional Deadlifting for Fighters:

Steve Says:

For fighters, especially MMA and grapplers, sandbag deadlifts with a round back style, bear hug style or grasping the cloth straightback style.
Partner lifts form the single leg, body lock or double leg position are also very beneficial. Barbell deadlifts are great for general strength
but they are a 'grooved' lift. Strength must be built in every position in the fighting game and barbell deadlifts just don't get it done.
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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 10:04 pm

Avoiding Redundancy In Martial Arts Conditioning:

Steve Says:

Endurance with martial arts is tricky. You mention that your endurance is not where you want it to be. You also say that your endurance is taxed very much in your tri-weekly sparring sessions. Let's identify just what it is that needs to be improved. Endurance is specific to the task. There is no thing as general endurance, fitness or even strength. You get good at the activity you do and get little carry over to other activities. some activities have a higher carry over value than others, kettlebell training for example. Your endurance in your martial art can be improved in three ways; improved muscular endurance, increased anerobic endurance (cardio) and increased skill. Obviously having more efficient muscular and heart conditioning will improve the activity. Increased skill also will improve your endurance because you learn economy of motion, how to make the other guy work harder and relaxation. One of the skills in my Brazilian Jiujitsu training is to make my opponent exhausted and gassed out. I have learned to relax and use as little energy as possible to secure holds, positions and submissions. Even though I am in my 50's, I can take energetic young bucks and leave them gasping in a few minutes. Often they complain about about 'not being in shape'. Sometimes this is the case, but more often than not it is because they do not know how to relax and do not have the skills, reflexes or techniques to answer my attacks. I have conditioned endurance for jiujitsu. Put me in a different game that I have not developed sufficient skills in and I would tire quickly. In martial arts, endurance is the skill. Doing a lot of wind sprints and endurance type circuits is great in the begginning of martial arts training. You can somewhat make up for a lack of skill with hustle, strength , power and anerobic endurance. This will take you so far. As your skills grow in the art, you will find that you won't need to as much of this type of training. The hard sparring sessions will be enough to keep you in top condition. Supplemental endurance training must be carefully added as it can easily lead to over training and over use injuries. One kettlebell swing or snatch based workout would be the ticket. The less sparring one does, the more of this type of workout could be added. I cycle my training so that when I have no tournament to prepare for, I do a lot more strength/endurance workouts and easy more infrequent live sparring. As I get close to a championship, I drop the supplemental training in favor of almost daily intense live sparring.
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Post by Grandpa's Spells » Tue Dec 27, 2005 10:04 pm

Preparing for BJJ Competition

Steve sez:

I have competed, coached and refereed at bjj tournaments all over the U.S. and Brazil. The most common mistake that all novices make is not pacing oneself and using up to much energy in their first match. You may have to fight up to 5 or 6 times in many tournaments and you need to learn to slow down the pace. Get your points early,hold the fight for a while and only go for the submission after you have already established your position.If you get behind in the score, then you will have to amp it up and force the fight.White belts are so frenzied that often they jump from position to position and don't even get credit for the score.Remember,each position must be held for three seconds before the referee will give the points. I once refereed a match where the one contestant passed the guard,put the knee on the belly and mounted only to jump back to cross side and end up in his opponents half guard.He moved so fast and crazy that I couldn't award any points at all! He could have scored 9 points,but he never showed any control.Try to relax and slow down.
As far as conditioning this close to the tournament, wrestle as much as possible. Try and work with guys that are smaller,weaker and with less technique than you so that you can repeatedly work your moves over and over again so that it becomes reflexive. Only once or twice a week should you seek out the guys that can give you a hard time or kick your butt. If you only train with tough guys that can beat you,you will only develope a defensive style.This was the wisdom handed to me by the great Saulo Ribeiro 5x world bjj champion and has helped me win two world and PanAmerican championships.
For supplemental exercise,skip rope,do chins,pullups,pistols,handstand and Hindu pushups,Hindu squats,dips,neck bridges,wall walks,stretching of all types and all your favorite ab exercises.Don't worry about absolute strength at this late date. Don't try and drop a lot of weight either.Fight your natural bodywt.You can resume wt.training and kettlebells after the tournament.Make your priority mat time. The week before the tournament,knock off the supplementary training 4 to 5 days out.
Just roll light the last couple of days and take a complete rest the day before.
Good luck,I may see you there.I have a few guys competeing.I am in the process of preparing myself for the world master/seniors in Brazil and I am following the exact advice I gave to you.

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Post by Fat Cat » Tue Dec 27, 2005 10:09 pm

Wrestling Leg Conditioning:

Steve Says:

Pistol in ladders or multiple sets plus Hindu squats--distance running is a waste, wrong energy system.
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Post by Fat Cat » Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:50 pm

Size and Strength:

Steve Says:

In order to get bigger and stronger, one must include heavy movements that stimulate the growth systems in the body. Squats, deadlifts, benches, dips, chin, pullups, rows and heavy overhead presses. because of your injury, you will be limited in your ability to produce large muscular increases. However, you can get really muscualar, shredded and strong in the upper body by including heavy weighted dips in your routine. Chins and dips are the perfect compliment and hit every muscle in the upper body. Organize a routine involving multiple sets of chins and dips, perhaps based on EDT. Through some presses and curls in the mix plus some savage ab work. For low back, hit the back extensions on the 45' bench or a stability ball. Work the deads and heavy squats back into your routine as soon as you are able.
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Post by Mickey O'neil » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:48 pm

Great stuff Mak. I took the time and went through Steve's posts and GG's posts on DD and IG and printed out just about everything they had posted training related. I have 4 big 3 ring binders full of training info. from Pavel, Mike Mahler, Steve Maxwell, Eddie (GG), Dan John, Garm, Tom Furman, etc.

hugojkd

Re: STEVE MAXWELL: Collected Works

Post by hugojkd » Sat Apr 18, 2009 2:51 am

Great posts from a great man, thank you.

Hugo

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Post by Fat Cat » Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:34 am

Grandpa's Spells wrote:Preparing for BJJ Competition

Steve sez:

I have competed, coached and refereed at bjj tournaments all over the U.S. and Brazil. The most common mistake that all novices make is not pacing oneself and using up to much energy in their first match. You may have to fight up to 5 or 6 times in many tournaments and you need to learn to slow down the pace. Get your points early,hold the fight for a while and only go for the submission after you have already established your position.If you get behind in the score, then you will have to amp it up and force the fight.White belts are so frenzied that often they jump from position to position and don't even get credit for the score.Remember,each position must be held for three seconds before the referee will give the points. I once refereed a match where the one contestant passed the guard,put the knee on the belly and mounted only to jump back to cross side and end up in his opponents half guard.He moved so fast and crazy that I couldn't award any points at all! He could have scored 9 points,but he never showed any control.Try to relax and slow down.
As far as conditioning this close to the tournament, wrestle as much as possible. Try and work with guys that are smaller,weaker and with less technique than you so that you can repeatedly work your moves over and over again so that it becomes reflexive. Only once or twice a week should you seek out the guys that can give you a hard time or kick your butt. If you only train with tough guys that can beat you,you will only develope a defensive style.This was the wisdom handed to me by the great Saulo Ribeiro 5x world bjj champion and has helped me win two world and PanAmerican championships.
For supplemental exercise,skip rope,do chins,pullups,pistols,handstand and Hindu pushups,Hindu squats,dips,neck bridges,wall walks,stretching of all types and all your favorite ab exercises.Don't worry about absolute strength at this late date. Don't try and drop a lot of weight either.Fight your natural bodywt.You can resume wt.training and kettlebells after the tournament.Make your priority mat time. The week before the tournament,knock off the supplementary training 4 to 5 days out.
Just roll light the last couple of days and take a complete rest the day before.
Good luck,I may see you there.I have a few guys competeing.I am in the process of preparing myself for the world master/seniors in Brazil and I am following the exact advice I gave to you.
There's a whole lifetime in this one post.
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Re: STEVE MAXWELL: Collected Works

Post by Herv100 » Mon Apr 20, 2009 1:29 am

Try and work with guys that are smaller,weaker and with less technique than you so that you can repeatedly work your moves over and over again so that it becomes reflexive. Only once or twice a week should you seek out the guys that can give you a hard time or kick your butt. If you only train with tough guys that can beat you,you will only develope a defensive style.This was the wisdom handed to me by the great Saulo Ribeiro 5x world bjj champion and has helped me win two world and PanAmerican championships

Indeed
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